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Article: Elevated Circulating Lipocalin-2 Levels Independently Predict Incident Cardiovascular Events in Men in a Population-Based Cohort

TitleElevated Circulating Lipocalin-2 Levels Independently Predict Incident Cardiovascular Events in Men in a Population-Based Cohort
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 2014, v. 34 n. 11, p. 2457-2464 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Adipose tissue inflammation and perturbation of adipokine secretion may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), mainly released from adipocytes, has been shown to be positively associated with CVD in cross-sectional studies. We aimed to evaluate the association of LCN2 with CVD involving a population-based cohort recruited from the Shanghai Diabetes Study. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Serum LCN2 levels were measured using ELISA. Independent predictors of CVD development were identified using Cox proportion hazards regression. The predictive performances of the various models were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. At baseline, circulating LCN2 was significantly associated with a cluster of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Baseline LCN2 levels in male subjects who developed CVD events during follow-up were significantly higher than those who did not develop CVD events (P=0.012). However, such difference was not significant in female subjects. LCN2 was a predictor of CVD in men, which remained statistically significant after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (hazard ratio, 1.038 [95% confidence interval, 1.017-1.060]). LCN2 remained significantly associated with incident CVD even after adjustment for renal function, adiponectin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. Kaplan-Meier analysis suggested combination of LCN2 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein might improve the prediction of CVD events in male subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated circulating LCN2 level is an independent predictor of CVD events in men in a population-based cohort and adds to the prognostic value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, which is currently the most extensively studied biomarker of CVD. Measurement of serum LCN2 might be useful for early detection and intervention of CVD.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214318

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, G-
dc.contributor.authorLi, H-
dc.contributor.authorFang, Q-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, S-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J-
dc.contributor.authorHou, X-
dc.contributor.authorLu, J-
dc.contributor.authorBao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorXu, A-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:13:03Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:13:03Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 2014, v. 34 n. 11, p. 2457-2464-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214318-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Adipose tissue inflammation and perturbation of adipokine secretion may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), mainly released from adipocytes, has been shown to be positively associated with CVD in cross-sectional studies. We aimed to evaluate the association of LCN2 with CVD involving a population-based cohort recruited from the Shanghai Diabetes Study. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Serum LCN2 levels were measured using ELISA. Independent predictors of CVD development were identified using Cox proportion hazards regression. The predictive performances of the various models were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. At baseline, circulating LCN2 was significantly associated with a cluster of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Baseline LCN2 levels in male subjects who developed CVD events during follow-up were significantly higher than those who did not develop CVD events (P=0.012). However, such difference was not significant in female subjects. LCN2 was a predictor of CVD in men, which remained statistically significant after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (hazard ratio, 1.038 [95% confidence interval, 1.017-1.060]). LCN2 remained significantly associated with incident CVD even after adjustment for renal function, adiponectin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. Kaplan-Meier analysis suggested combination of LCN2 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein might improve the prediction of CVD events in male subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated circulating LCN2 level is an independent predictor of CVD events in men in a population-based cohort and adds to the prognostic value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, which is currently the most extensively studied biomarker of CVD. Measurement of serum LCN2 might be useful for early detection and intervention of CVD.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology-
dc.titleElevated Circulating Lipocalin-2 Levels Independently Predict Incident Cardiovascular Events in Men in a Population-Based Cohort-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485-
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/ATVBAHA.114.303718-
dc.identifier.hkuros246856-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage2457-
dc.identifier.epage2464-

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