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Article: Becoming a God: Max Weber and the social construction of charisma

TitleBecoming a God: Max Weber and the social construction of charisma
Authors
KeywordsRudolph Sohm
social constructionism
St. Paul
charismatic authority
Charisma
Max Weber
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Classical Sociology, 2014, v. 14, n. 3, p. 266-283 How to Cite?
Abstract© The Author(s) 2014. This article seeks to demonstrate that implicit within Weber’s writings on charisma are tools that can enable a processual, social constructionist understanding of charismatic formation. A corollary of this point is that Weber’s writings represent an historically crucial turning point in the progression from a Carlylian idea of leaders as inherently powerful to a non-essentialist, sociological perspective, and that Weber’s inspiration for this progression is best understood not through reference to his nineteenth-century forbearers in the social sciences, but rather in his contrast with the very few theological writers (namely Rudolph Sohm and the writers of the New Testament) who actually had employed charisma as a term prior to Weber’s famous appropriation of it. A reinterpretation and retranslation of Weber’s writings on charisma that gives priority to the social constructionist elements in his thought can provide tools for navigating through many of the interpretational controversies that have plagued charisma research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214035
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.321

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJoosse, Paul-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:36Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Classical Sociology, 2014, v. 14, n. 3, p. 266-283-
dc.identifier.issn1468-795X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214035-
dc.description.abstract© The Author(s) 2014. This article seeks to demonstrate that implicit within Weber’s writings on charisma are tools that can enable a processual, social constructionist understanding of charismatic formation. A corollary of this point is that Weber’s writings represent an historically crucial turning point in the progression from a Carlylian idea of leaders as inherently powerful to a non-essentialist, sociological perspective, and that Weber’s inspiration for this progression is best understood not through reference to his nineteenth-century forbearers in the social sciences, but rather in his contrast with the very few theological writers (namely Rudolph Sohm and the writers of the New Testament) who actually had employed charisma as a term prior to Weber’s famous appropriation of it. A reinterpretation and retranslation of Weber’s writings on charisma that gives priority to the social constructionist elements in his thought can provide tools for navigating through many of the interpretational controversies that have plagued charisma research.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Classical Sociology-
dc.subjectRudolph Sohm-
dc.subjectsocial constructionism-
dc.subjectSt. Paul-
dc.subjectcharismatic authority-
dc.subjectCharisma-
dc.subjectMax Weber-
dc.titleBecoming a God: Max Weber and the social construction of charisma-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1468795X14536652-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84896830860-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage266-
dc.identifier.epage283-
dc.identifier.eissn1741-2897-

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