File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Crack coalescence in molded gypsum and carrara marble: Part 1. macroscopic observations and interpretation

TitleCrack coalescence in molded gypsum and carrara marble: Part 1. macroscopic observations and interpretation
Authors
KeywordsCrack type classification scheme
Uniaxial compressive loading test
Tensile cracks
Shear cracks
High speed camera
Issue Date2009
Citation
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, 2009, v. 42, n. 3, p. 475-511 How to Cite?
AbstractCracking and coalescence behavior has been studied experimentally with prismatic laboratory-molded gypsum and Carrara marble specimens containing two parallel pre-existing open flaws. This was done at both the macroscopic and the microscopic scales, and the results are presented in two separate papers. This paper (the first of two) summarizes the macroscopic experimental results and investigates the influence of the different flaw geometries and material, on the cracking processes. In the companion paper (also in this issue), most of the macroscopic deformation and cracking processes shown in this present paper will be related to the underlying microscopic changes. In the present study, a high speed video system was used, which allowed us to precisely observe the cracking mechanisms. Nine crack coalescence categories with different crack types and trajectories were identified. The flaw inclination angle (β), the ligament length (L), that is, intact rock length between the flaws, and the bridging angle (α), that is, the inclination of a line linking up the inner flaw tips, between two flaws, had different effects on the coalescence patterns. One of the pronounced differences observed between marble and gypsum during the compression loading test was the development of macroscopic white patches prior to the initiation of macroscopic cracks in marble, but not in gypsum. Comparing the cracking and coalescence behaviors in the two tested materials, tensile cracking generally occurred more often in marble than in gypsum for the same flaw pair geometries. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213924
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.386
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.939

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, L. N Y-
dc.contributor.authorEinstein, H. H.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:14Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationRock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, 2009, v. 42, n. 3, p. 475-511-
dc.identifier.issn0723-2632-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213924-
dc.description.abstractCracking and coalescence behavior has been studied experimentally with prismatic laboratory-molded gypsum and Carrara marble specimens containing two parallel pre-existing open flaws. This was done at both the macroscopic and the microscopic scales, and the results are presented in two separate papers. This paper (the first of two) summarizes the macroscopic experimental results and investigates the influence of the different flaw geometries and material, on the cracking processes. In the companion paper (also in this issue), most of the macroscopic deformation and cracking processes shown in this present paper will be related to the underlying microscopic changes. In the present study, a high speed video system was used, which allowed us to precisely observe the cracking mechanisms. Nine crack coalescence categories with different crack types and trajectories were identified. The flaw inclination angle (β), the ligament length (L), that is, intact rock length between the flaws, and the bridging angle (α), that is, the inclination of a line linking up the inner flaw tips, between two flaws, had different effects on the coalescence patterns. One of the pronounced differences observed between marble and gypsum during the compression loading test was the development of macroscopic white patches prior to the initiation of macroscopic cracks in marble, but not in gypsum. Comparing the cracking and coalescence behaviors in the two tested materials, tensile cracking generally occurred more often in marble than in gypsum for the same flaw pair geometries. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofRock Mechanics and Rock Engineering-
dc.subjectCrack type classification scheme-
dc.subjectUniaxial compressive loading test-
dc.subjectTensile cracks-
dc.subjectShear cracks-
dc.subjectHigh speed camera-
dc.titleCrack coalescence in molded gypsum and carrara marble: Part 1. macroscopic observations and interpretation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00603-008-0002-4-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67349246812-
dc.identifier.volume42-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage475-
dc.identifier.epage511-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats