File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Sensorineural Hearing Loss After Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Longitudinal Analysis

TitleSensorineural Hearing Loss After Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Longitudinal Analysis
Authors
KeywordsPrognostic factors
Sensorineural hearing loss
Chemoradiotherapy
Dose constraint
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Issue Date2009
Citation
International Journal of Radiation Oncology - Biology - Physics, 2009, v. 73, n. 5, p. 1335-1342 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To analyze the effects of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in relation to sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) after contemporary treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 87 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were treated with RT or chemoradiotherapy using either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT between 2004 and 2005. Tympanometry and pure-tone audiogram assessments were performed before treatment and then serially at 6-month intervals. The dose-volume data of the cochlea were analyzed. The effects of cisplatin administered in concurrent and nonconcurrent phases was explored. Results: Of the 170 eligible ears, RT (n = 30) and chemoradiotherapy (n = 140) resulted in 40% (n = 12) and 56.4% (n = 79) persistent SNHL (≥15 dB loss), respectively, after a median follow-up of 2 years. SNHL at a high frequency was more frequent statistically in the chemoradiotherapy group than in the RT-alone group (55% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01), but not at a low frequency (7.9% vs. 16.7%, p = 0.14). Within the chemoradiotherapy group, the mean cochlea dose and concurrent cisplatin dose were important determinants of high-frequency SNHL, with an odds ratio of 1.07/Gy increase (p = 0.01) and an odds ratio of 1.008/mg/m2 increase (p < 0.01), respectively. Age, gender, and nonconcurrent cisplatin dose were not statistically significant factors. A mean radiation dose to the cochlea of <47 Gy would result in <15% of patients developing severe (≥30 dB) high-frequency SNHL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that high-frequency SNHL is significantly related to the mean cochlea dose and the concurrent cisplatin dose. A mean dose constraint of 47 Gy to the cochlea is recommended to minimize SNHL after chemoradiotherapy. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213921
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.495
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.274

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, S. H.-
dc.contributor.authorNg, W. T.-
dc.contributor.authorKam, K. L.-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Michael C H-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, C. W.-
dc.contributor.authorYau, T. K.-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Anne W M-
dc.contributor.authorChow, S. K.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:14Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology - Biology - Physics, 2009, v. 73, n. 5, p. 1335-1342-
dc.identifier.issn0360-3016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213921-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To analyze the effects of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in relation to sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) after contemporary treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 87 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were treated with RT or chemoradiotherapy using either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT between 2004 and 2005. Tympanometry and pure-tone audiogram assessments were performed before treatment and then serially at 6-month intervals. The dose-volume data of the cochlea were analyzed. The effects of cisplatin administered in concurrent and nonconcurrent phases was explored. Results: Of the 170 eligible ears, RT (n = 30) and chemoradiotherapy (n = 140) resulted in 40% (n = 12) and 56.4% (n = 79) persistent SNHL (≥15 dB loss), respectively, after a median follow-up of 2 years. SNHL at a high frequency was more frequent statistically in the chemoradiotherapy group than in the RT-alone group (55% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01), but not at a low frequency (7.9% vs. 16.7%, p = 0.14). Within the chemoradiotherapy group, the mean cochlea dose and concurrent cisplatin dose were important determinants of high-frequency SNHL, with an odds ratio of 1.07/Gy increase (p = 0.01) and an odds ratio of 1.008/mg/m2 increase (p < 0.01), respectively. Age, gender, and nonconcurrent cisplatin dose were not statistically significant factors. A mean radiation dose to the cochlea of <47 Gy would result in <15% of patients developing severe (≥30 dB) high-frequency SNHL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that high-frequency SNHL is significantly related to the mean cochlea dose and the concurrent cisplatin dose. A mean dose constraint of 47 Gy to the cochlea is recommended to minimize SNHL after chemoradiotherapy. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology - Biology - Physics-
dc.subjectPrognostic factors-
dc.subjectSensorineural hearing loss-
dc.subjectChemoradiotherapy-
dc.subjectDose constraint-
dc.subjectNasopharyngeal carcinoma-
dc.titleSensorineural Hearing Loss After Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Longitudinal Analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.07.034-
dc.identifier.pmid18922648-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62649131170-
dc.identifier.hkuros266189-
dc.identifier.volume73-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1335-
dc.identifier.epage1342-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats