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Article: Silence, Charisma and power: The case of John de Ruiter

TitleSilence, Charisma and power: The case of John de Ruiter
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
Journal of Contemporary Religion, 2006, v. 21, n. 3, p. 355-371 How to Cite?
AbstractCharismatic authority, as Max Weber originally conceived it, is predicated on followers' perceptions that their leader possesses superhuman or extraordinary powers. This article points to a novel link between silence and charismatic authority by examining the new religious movement (NRM) led by John de Ruiter and showing the important role that interpersonal silence plays in the social construction of his superhuman status. Specifically, de Ruiter's management of three distinct aspects or qualities of interpersonal silence allows him to perform seemingly miraculous feats for his devotees. Firstly, the projection-eliciting aspect, of interpersonal silence fosters the belief within devotees that de Ruiter has the ability to speak to the specific personal needs of people whom he has never met. Secondly, the punitive aspect of silence enables de Ruiter to perform superhuman displays of power over others at meetings. Thirdly, de Ruiter's use of silence fosters the belief that he has a miraculous ability to form intimate bonds with complete strangers, simply by gazing at them. To familiarize readers with this NRM, the article begins with a description of the group's culture, belief system, form of worship, methods of generating revenue, and recruitment strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213908
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.482

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJoosse, Paul-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:10Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Contemporary Religion, 2006, v. 21, n. 3, p. 355-371-
dc.identifier.issn1353-7903-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213908-
dc.description.abstractCharismatic authority, as Max Weber originally conceived it, is predicated on followers' perceptions that their leader possesses superhuman or extraordinary powers. This article points to a novel link between silence and charismatic authority by examining the new religious movement (NRM) led by John de Ruiter and showing the important role that interpersonal silence plays in the social construction of his superhuman status. Specifically, de Ruiter's management of three distinct aspects or qualities of interpersonal silence allows him to perform seemingly miraculous feats for his devotees. Firstly, the projection-eliciting aspect, of interpersonal silence fosters the belief within devotees that de Ruiter has the ability to speak to the specific personal needs of people whom he has never met. Secondly, the punitive aspect of silence enables de Ruiter to perform superhuman displays of power over others at meetings. Thirdly, de Ruiter's use of silence fosters the belief that he has a miraculous ability to form intimate bonds with complete strangers, simply by gazing at them. To familiarize readers with this NRM, the article begins with a description of the group's culture, belief system, form of worship, methods of generating revenue, and recruitment strategies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Contemporary Religion-
dc.titleSilence, Charisma and power: The case of John de Ruiter-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13537900600926147-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347293626-
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage355-
dc.identifier.epage371-
dc.identifier.eissn1469-9419-

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