File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Water saturation effects on the brazilian tensile strength of gypsum and assessment of cracking processes using high-speed video

TitleWater saturation effects on the brazilian tensile strength of gypsum and assessment of cracking processes using high-speed video
Authors
KeywordsCrack initiation
Brazilian disc test
Tensile strength
High-speed video
Gypsum
Issue Date2014
Citation
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, 2014, v. 47, n. 4, p. 1103-1115 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigates the water weakening effect on the tensile strength, as well as the fracturing behavior, of an artificially molded Hydrocal B-11 gypsum rock. Brazilian disc tests, with the aid of a high-speed video system to monitor and record the cracking processes, are conducted on dry and wet specimens to determine their tensile strengths. The dry specimens are oven-dried, while the wet specimens are prepared by soaking in water for 1, 3, and 10 weeks to achieve different levels of water content. The test results show that the tensile strength drops to nearly half of its dry value after being soaked in water for only 1 week. The tensile strength reduces only slightly further after the specimens have been immersed in water for 3 and 10 weeks. An analysis of the recorded high-speed footage shows that the primary crack initiates at the center as observed from the surface for the majority of the tested specimens. Most importantly, the cracking processes of dry and wet specimens are distinctly different with regard to the speed of crack propagation and the number of cracks developed. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Wien.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213873
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.386
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.939

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Louis Ngai Yuen-
dc.contributor.authorJong, Ming Chuan-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:02Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationRock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, 2014, v. 47, n. 4, p. 1103-1115-
dc.identifier.issn0723-2632-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213873-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the water weakening effect on the tensile strength, as well as the fracturing behavior, of an artificially molded Hydrocal B-11 gypsum rock. Brazilian disc tests, with the aid of a high-speed video system to monitor and record the cracking processes, are conducted on dry and wet specimens to determine their tensile strengths. The dry specimens are oven-dried, while the wet specimens are prepared by soaking in water for 1, 3, and 10 weeks to achieve different levels of water content. The test results show that the tensile strength drops to nearly half of its dry value after being soaked in water for only 1 week. The tensile strength reduces only slightly further after the specimens have been immersed in water for 3 and 10 weeks. An analysis of the recorded high-speed footage shows that the primary crack initiates at the center as observed from the surface for the majority of the tested specimens. Most importantly, the cracking processes of dry and wet specimens are distinctly different with regard to the speed of crack propagation and the number of cracks developed. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Wien.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofRock Mechanics and Rock Engineering-
dc.subjectCrack initiation-
dc.subjectBrazilian disc test-
dc.subjectTensile strength-
dc.subjectHigh-speed video-
dc.subjectGypsum-
dc.titleWater saturation effects on the brazilian tensile strength of gypsum and assessment of cracking processes using high-speed video-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00603-013-0436-1-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84903445424-
dc.identifier.hkuros259203-
dc.identifier.volume47-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage1103-
dc.identifier.epage1115-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats