File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Consequences of differential attention: the impact of leader gaze on status and team performance.

TitleConsequences of differential attention: the impact of leader gaze on status and team performance.
Authors
KeywordsNonverbal Behavior
Status Hierarchy
Team Performance
Issue Date2013
PublisherAcademy of Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aomonline.org/aom.asp?id=156
Citation
The 73rd Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM), Orlando, FL., 9-13 August 2013. In Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings, 2013, v. 2013 meeting abstract suppl., abstract no. 16657 How to Cite?
AbstractStatus within a group can be quickly achieved. Research has shown, for instance, that individual traits such as race, gender, or expertise influence individuals’ status and their team’s early interactions. The current research digs into the micro-behaviors of these early interactions by investigating the potent impact of a team leader’s nonverbal behavior (e.g., unequal visual attention) on the status hierarchy within small groups. In Study 1, individuals who received more of a leader’s visual attention were more likely to influence group decisions than individuals who received less of a leader’s visual attention, and groups that received this unequal visual attention performed worse than groups that received equal attention. Study 2 investigated whether the effects of a leader’s visual attention were due simply to the attention itself or whether it depended on the leader’s status. The results supported the latter hypothesis, as attention transferred status: more attention from a high-status leader increased a person’s status but more attention from a low-status leader decreased it.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213796
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShim, S-
dc.contributor.authorLivingston, RW-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T06:42:58Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-18T06:42:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationThe 73rd Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM), Orlando, FL., 9-13 August 2013. In Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings, 2013, v. 2013 meeting abstract suppl., abstract no. 16657-
dc.identifier.issn2151-6561-(electronic)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213796-
dc.description.abstractStatus within a group can be quickly achieved. Research has shown, for instance, that individual traits such as race, gender, or expertise influence individuals’ status and their team’s early interactions. The current research digs into the micro-behaviors of these early interactions by investigating the potent impact of a team leader’s nonverbal behavior (e.g., unequal visual attention) on the status hierarchy within small groups. In Study 1, individuals who received more of a leader’s visual attention were more likely to influence group decisions than individuals who received less of a leader’s visual attention, and groups that received this unequal visual attention performed worse than groups that received equal attention. Study 2 investigated whether the effects of a leader’s visual attention were due simply to the attention itself or whether it depended on the leader’s status. The results supported the latter hypothesis, as attention transferred status: more attention from a high-status leader increased a person’s status but more attention from a low-status leader decreased it.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcademy of Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aomonline.org/aom.asp?id=156-
dc.relation.ispartofAcademy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings-
dc.subjectNonverbal Behavior-
dc.subjectStatus Hierarchy-
dc.subjectTeam Performance-
dc.titleConsequences of differential attention: the impact of leader gaze on status and team performance.-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailShim, S: sshim19@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityShim, S=rp01929-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.5465/AMBPP.2013.16657abstract-
dc.identifier.hkuros246464-
dc.identifier.volume2013-
dc.identifier.issuemeeting abstract suppl.-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats