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Article: Carriage niches and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus lugdunensis and methicillin-resistant S. lugdunensis among patients undergoing long-term renal replacement therapy

TitleCarriage niches and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus lugdunensis and methicillin-resistant S. lugdunensis among patients undergoing long-term renal replacement therapy
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diagmicrobio
Citation
Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 2015, v. 81 n. 2, p. 141-144 How to Cite?
AbstractWe collected nasal, axilla, and groin swabs from 252 adult patients from 2 nephrology centers in Hong Kong. Staphylococcus lugdunensis carriage was detected in 51.6% patients (groin, 39.3%; axilla, 19.8%; nose, 17.9%). The carriage rates of methicillin-sensitive S. lugdunensis and methicillin-resistant S. lugdunensis (MRSL) were 46.0% and 8.3%, respectively. Independent risk factors for S. lugdunensis carriage included male sex (odds ratio [OR], 4.4), hemodialysis (OR, 2.2), and aged 18–50 years (OR, 2.4). The isolates belonged to 10 pulsotype clusters (n = 129) and 8 singletons (n = 8). All MRSL and most gentamicin- and tetracycline-resistant strains were found in a predominating sequence type 3 clone, designated HKU1, which accounted for 51.8% of all colonizing S. lugdunensis strains. The 21 MRSL isolates had SCCmec type V (n = 18), type IV (n = 2), and type I (n = 1). The finding highlights the potential for dissemination of multidrug resistance through successful S. lugdunensis clones.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213731
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.45
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.142
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SMH-
dc.contributor.authorChow, KH-
dc.contributor.authorTse, CWS-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCC-
dc.contributor.authorTse, H-
dc.contributor.authorMak, SK-
dc.contributor.authorLo, WK-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-14T03:41:33Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-14T03:41:33Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 2015, v. 81 n. 2, p. 141-144-
dc.identifier.issn0732-8893-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213731-
dc.description.abstractWe collected nasal, axilla, and groin swabs from 252 adult patients from 2 nephrology centers in Hong Kong. Staphylococcus lugdunensis carriage was detected in 51.6% patients (groin, 39.3%; axilla, 19.8%; nose, 17.9%). The carriage rates of methicillin-sensitive S. lugdunensis and methicillin-resistant S. lugdunensis (MRSL) were 46.0% and 8.3%, respectively. Independent risk factors for S. lugdunensis carriage included male sex (odds ratio [OR], 4.4), hemodialysis (OR, 2.2), and aged 18–50 years (OR, 2.4). The isolates belonged to 10 pulsotype clusters (n = 129) and 8 singletons (n = 8). All MRSL and most gentamicin- and tetracycline-resistant strains were found in a predominating sequence type 3 clone, designated HKU1, which accounted for 51.8% of all colonizing S. lugdunensis strains. The 21 MRSL isolates had SCCmec type V (n = 18), type IV (n = 2), and type I (n = 1). The finding highlights the potential for dissemination of multidrug resistance through successful S. lugdunensis clones.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diagmicrobio-
dc.relation.ispartofDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease-
dc.rights© 2015. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCarriage niches and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus lugdunensis and methicillin-resistant S. lugdunensis among patients undergoing long-term renal replacement therapy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL: plho@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, KH: khchowb@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, VCC: vcccheng@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTse, H: htse@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406-
dc.identifier.authorityChow, KH=rp00370-
dc.identifier.authorityTse, H=rp00519-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2014.10.004-
dc.identifier.pmid25498337-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84922411333-
dc.identifier.hkuros246371-
dc.identifier.volume81-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage141-
dc.identifier.epage144-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000348491500015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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