File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Conference Paper: Effects of Tai-chi on functioning, symptoms, and movement coordination on patients with schizophrenia

TitleEffects of Tai-chi on functioning, symptoms, and movement coordination on patients with schizophrenia
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160
Citation
The 36th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2015), San Antonio, TX., 22-25 April 2015. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2015, v. 49 suppl. 1, p. S78 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Patients with schizophrenia require long-term care and management of psychotic symptoms via anti-psychotic medication, which may induce side effects and reduce patients' functioning. Tai-chi is an Eastern mind-body health exercise that emphasizes motor coordination. The present study aimed to examine the effects of Tai-chi intervention on the cognitive and motor deficits of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: A 3-arm randomized control trial was conducted to recruit 151 residential patients with schizophrenia (mean age = 54.0 years, SD = 8.5) who were randomized into Tai-chi, exercise, or waitlist control groups. Both the Tai-chi and exercise groups were given 12 weeks of specific intervention on top of the standard medication and care. All participants were assessed in terms of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Barthel’s Activities of Daily Living Index, and Neurological Evaluation Scale at baseline, at 12 weeks (post-intervention) and at 24 weeks (maintenance). Latent growth modeling was used to assess the intervention effects on daily living function, symptom management, and movement coordination. Results: Participants in the three groups did not significantly differ on demographics and baseline status of the outcome variables. Both the Tai-chi and exercise groups showed significant improvement (p < .05) in daily living function over the control group over time. Compared to the control group, participants in the Tai-chi group revealed significant decreases in motor deficits (p < .01) in terms of balancing, motor coordination and sequencing. No intervention effects were found (p > .05) for Tai-chi on management of the psychotic symptoms. Discussions: These results suggest that Tai-chi psychotherapy may have some therapeutic effects in reducing the motor deficits and improving the daily functioning of residential patients with schizophrenia. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the General Research Fund, Research Grants Council (GRF/HKU744912). The authors would like to acknowledge the staff of the Providence Garden of Rehab, Hong Kong, for their provision of support and coordination for the study.
DescriptionMeeting Theme: Advancing the National Prevention Strategy Through Behavioral Medicine Innovation
Paper Session 10: Complementary, Integrative, and Alternative Medicine Interventions
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213525
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.112

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTH-
dc.contributor.authorFong, TCT-
dc.contributor.authorWan, AHY-
dc.contributor.authorAu-Yeung, FSW-
dc.contributor.authorSiu, CY-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CPK-
dc.contributor.authorNg, WYH-
dc.contributor.authorLo, PHY-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, IKM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.contributor.authorNg, SM-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T07:42:17Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-04T07:42:17Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 36th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2015), San Antonio, TX., 22-25 April 2015. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2015, v. 49 suppl. 1, p. S78-
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213525-
dc.descriptionMeeting Theme: Advancing the National Prevention Strategy Through Behavioral Medicine Innovation-
dc.descriptionPaper Session 10: Complementary, Integrative, and Alternative Medicine Interventions-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patients with schizophrenia require long-term care and management of psychotic symptoms via anti-psychotic medication, which may induce side effects and reduce patients' functioning. Tai-chi is an Eastern mind-body health exercise that emphasizes motor coordination. The present study aimed to examine the effects of Tai-chi intervention on the cognitive and motor deficits of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: A 3-arm randomized control trial was conducted to recruit 151 residential patients with schizophrenia (mean age = 54.0 years, SD = 8.5) who were randomized into Tai-chi, exercise, or waitlist control groups. Both the Tai-chi and exercise groups were given 12 weeks of specific intervention on top of the standard medication and care. All participants were assessed in terms of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Barthel’s Activities of Daily Living Index, and Neurological Evaluation Scale at baseline, at 12 weeks (post-intervention) and at 24 weeks (maintenance). Latent growth modeling was used to assess the intervention effects on daily living function, symptom management, and movement coordination. Results: Participants in the three groups did not significantly differ on demographics and baseline status of the outcome variables. Both the Tai-chi and exercise groups showed significant improvement (p < .05) in daily living function over the control group over time. Compared to the control group, participants in the Tai-chi group revealed significant decreases in motor deficits (p < .01) in terms of balancing, motor coordination and sequencing. No intervention effects were found (p > .05) for Tai-chi on management of the psychotic symptoms. Discussions: These results suggest that Tai-chi psychotherapy may have some therapeutic effects in reducing the motor deficits and improving the daily functioning of residential patients with schizophrenia. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the General Research Fund, Research Grants Council (GRF/HKU744912). The authors would like to acknowledge the staff of the Providence Garden of Rehab, Hong Kong, for their provision of support and coordination for the study.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Behavioral Medicine-
dc.titleEffects of Tai-chi on functioning, symptoms, and movement coordination on patients with schizophrenia-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, TCT: ttaatt@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWan, AHY: awan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, IKM: irenech@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12160-015-9688-1-
dc.identifier.hkuros246055-
dc.identifier.volume49-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS78-
dc.identifier.epageS78-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats