File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Book Chapter: Magic

TitleMagic
Authors
KeywordsAncient magic
Sacred disease
Greek magic
Religious practice
Plato
Medicine
Magicians
Mageia
Issue Date2012
Citation
The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies, 2012 How to Cite?
Abstract© Oxford University Press 2009. All rights reserved. This article points out the problems of identifying ancient magic and outlines connections between medical, magical, and religious practices. The central problem for any student of Greek magic is that the term mageia, from which people ultimately derive 'magic', only emerges in the latter half of the fifth century BCE, whereas the evidence for practices and substances that were understood to be magical, as well as for individuals who were thought to be magicians, existed prior to the birth of the term. Mageia means on the one hand the 'activity of a magos' and, on the other, 'magic' in the looser sense defined by the Hippocratic author of On the Sacred Disease and Plato.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213453

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Derek-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T04:07:20Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-28T04:07:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationThe Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies, 2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213453-
dc.description.abstract© Oxford University Press 2009. All rights reserved. This article points out the problems of identifying ancient magic and outlines connections between medical, magical, and religious practices. The central problem for any student of Greek magic is that the term mageia, from which people ultimately derive 'magic', only emerges in the latter half of the fifth century BCE, whereas the evidence for practices and substances that were understood to be magical, as well as for individuals who were thought to be magicians, existed prior to the birth of the term. Mageia means on the one hand the 'activity of a magos' and, on the other, 'magic' in the looser sense defined by the Hippocratic author of On the Sacred Disease and Plato.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies-
dc.subjectAncient magic-
dc.subjectSacred disease-
dc.subjectGreek magic-
dc.subjectReligious practice-
dc.subjectPlato-
dc.subjectMedicine-
dc.subjectMagicians-
dc.subjectMageia-
dc.titleMagic-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199286140.013.0047-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84924274844-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats