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Article: Breastfeeding and adolescent blood pressure: evidence from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" Birth Cohort.

TitleBreastfeeding and adolescent blood pressure: evidence from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" Birth Cohort.
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
American journal of epidemiology, 2013, v. 178, n. 6, p. 928-936 How to Cite?
AbstractObservationally, breastfeeding is associated with lower blood pressure in Western developed settings, whereas little association exists in developing settings. However, postnatal characteristics (e.g., breast milk substitutes, infection rates, underweight, and pubertal timing) differ between these settings. We examined the association of breastfeeding with blood pressure at ∼13 years, using multivariable linear regression, in 5,247 term births in 1997 from a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort where socioeconomic patterning of breastfeeding differs from that of Western and developing settings but standard of living, social infrastructure, and postnatal characteristics are similar to those of Western settings. Higher education is associated with short-term breastfeeding but recent migration with longer-term breastfeeding. Compared with never breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding for ≥3 months was not associated with blood pressure (systolic mean difference = 0.82 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.46, 2.11 and diastolic mean difference = 0.49 mm Hg, 95% CI: -0.22, 1.21), nor was partial breastfeeding for any length of time or exclusive breastfeeding for <3 months (systolic mean difference = 0.01 mm Hg, 95% CI: -0.64, 0.66 and diastolic mean difference = 0.16 mm Hg, 95% CI: -0.20, 0.52), adjusted for socioeconomic position and infant characteristics. Lack of association in a non-Western developed setting further suggests that observations concerning breastfeeding and blood pressure vary with setting, thereby casting doubt on causality.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213361

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Man Ki-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Gabriel M.-
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, C. Mary-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T04:07:01Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-28T04:07:01Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican journal of epidemiology, 2013, v. 178, n. 6, p. 928-936-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213361-
dc.description.abstractObservationally, breastfeeding is associated with lower blood pressure in Western developed settings, whereas little association exists in developing settings. However, postnatal characteristics (e.g., breast milk substitutes, infection rates, underweight, and pubertal timing) differ between these settings. We examined the association of breastfeeding with blood pressure at ∼13 years, using multivariable linear regression, in 5,247 term births in 1997 from a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort where socioeconomic patterning of breastfeeding differs from that of Western and developing settings but standard of living, social infrastructure, and postnatal characteristics are similar to those of Western settings. Higher education is associated with short-term breastfeeding but recent migration with longer-term breastfeeding. Compared with never breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding for ≥3 months was not associated with blood pressure (systolic mean difference = 0.82 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.46, 2.11 and diastolic mean difference = 0.49 mm Hg, 95% CI: -0.22, 1.21), nor was partial breastfeeding for any length of time or exclusive breastfeeding for <3 months (systolic mean difference = 0.01 mm Hg, 95% CI: -0.64, 0.66 and diastolic mean difference = 0.16 mm Hg, 95% CI: -0.20, 0.52), adjusted for socioeconomic position and infant characteristics. Lack of association in a non-Western developed setting further suggests that observations concerning breastfeeding and blood pressure vary with setting, thereby casting doubt on causality.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican journal of epidemiology-
dc.titleBreastfeeding and adolescent blood pressure: evidence from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" Birth Cohort.-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid23857775-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84885866801-
dc.identifier.volume178-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage928-
dc.identifier.epage936-
dc.identifier.eissn1476-6256-

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