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Article: Mapping CD20 molecules on the lymphoma cell surface using atomic force microscopy

TitleMapping CD20 molecules on the lymphoma cell surface using atomic force microscopy
Authors
KeywordsCD20
rituximab
lift scan
force curve
atomic force microscopy
Issue Date2013
Citation
Chinese Science Bulletin, 2013, v. 58, n. 13, p. 1516-1519 How to Cite?
AbstractAtomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to locate CD20 molecules on the surface of lymphoma Raji cells. Rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20) molecules were linked onto the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. Raji cells were adsorbed onto glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine. First, the CD20 distribution in a local area of the cell surface was visualized using the AFM lift scan mode. Second, 16 × 16 force curves were obtained from the same cell area to construct the CD20-rituximab binding force map. Finally, free rituximab was added to block the CD20 molecules on the cell surface and the lift phase image and CD20-rituximab force map were obtained again. The experimental results indicated that when the lift height was greater than the length of the PEG linker, no recognition sites were observed in the lift phase image. However, as the lift height decreased to the length of the PEG linker, some recognition sites were observed in the lift phase image and these sites were generally consistent with the pixels in the force map. After blocking, both the recognition sites in the lift phase image and the gray pixels in the binding force map decreased markedly. These results can improve our understanding of the distribution of protein molecules on the cell surface and facilitate further investigations into cellular functions. © 2013 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213309
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.789

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Mi-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, LianQing Q.-
dc.contributor.authorXi, Ning-
dc.contributor.authorWang, YueChao C.-
dc.contributor.authorDong, ZaiLi L.-
dc.contributor.authorXiao, XiuBin B.-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WeiJing J.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T04:06:50Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-28T04:06:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationChinese Science Bulletin, 2013, v. 58, n. 13, p. 1516-1519-
dc.identifier.issn1001-6538-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213309-
dc.description.abstractAtomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to locate CD20 molecules on the surface of lymphoma Raji cells. Rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20) molecules were linked onto the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. Raji cells were adsorbed onto glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine. First, the CD20 distribution in a local area of the cell surface was visualized using the AFM lift scan mode. Second, 16 × 16 force curves were obtained from the same cell area to construct the CD20-rituximab binding force map. Finally, free rituximab was added to block the CD20 molecules on the cell surface and the lift phase image and CD20-rituximab force map were obtained again. The experimental results indicated that when the lift height was greater than the length of the PEG linker, no recognition sites were observed in the lift phase image. However, as the lift height decreased to the length of the PEG linker, some recognition sites were observed in the lift phase image and these sites were generally consistent with the pixels in the force map. After blocking, both the recognition sites in the lift phase image and the gray pixels in the binding force map decreased markedly. These results can improve our understanding of the distribution of protein molecules on the cell surface and facilitate further investigations into cellular functions. © 2013 The Author(s).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Science Bulletin-
dc.subjectCD20-
dc.subjectrituximab-
dc.subjectlift scan-
dc.subjectforce curve-
dc.subjectatomic force microscopy-
dc.titleMapping CD20 molecules on the lymphoma cell surface using atomic force microscopy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11434-012-5658-1-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84877026245-
dc.identifier.volume58-
dc.identifier.issue13-
dc.identifier.spage1516-
dc.identifier.epage1519-
dc.identifier.eissn1861-9541-

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