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Article: Probing membrane proteins using atomic force microscopy

TitleProbing membrane proteins using atomic force microscopy
Authors
KeywordsMembrane protein
Single molecule recognition
Sensory neuron
Tip functionalization
AFM
AT1 receptor
Issue Date2006
Citation
Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2006, v. 97, n. 6, p. 1191-1197 How to Cite?
AbstractTo gain insights into how biological molecules function, advanced technologies enabling imaging, sensing, and actuating single molecules are required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) would be one of novel potential tools for these tasks. In this study, techniques and efforts using AFM to probe biomolecules are introduced and reviewed. The state-of-art techniques for characterizing specific single receptor using the functionalized AFM tip are discussed. An example of studying the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors expressed in sensory neuronal cells by AFM with a functionalized tip is given. Perspectives for identifying and characterizing specific individual membrane proteins using AFM in living cells are provided. Given that many diseases have their roots at the molecular scale and are best understood as a malfunctioning biological nanomachines, the prospects of these unique techniques in basic biomedical research or in clinical practice are beyond our imagination. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212863
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.446
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.520

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Guangyong-
dc.contributor.authorXi, Ning-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Donna H.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T04:05:15Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-28T04:05:15Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2006, v. 97, n. 6, p. 1191-1197-
dc.identifier.issn0730-2312-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212863-
dc.description.abstractTo gain insights into how biological molecules function, advanced technologies enabling imaging, sensing, and actuating single molecules are required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) would be one of novel potential tools for these tasks. In this study, techniques and efforts using AFM to probe biomolecules are introduced and reviewed. The state-of-art techniques for characterizing specific single receptor using the functionalized AFM tip are discussed. An example of studying the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors expressed in sensory neuronal cells by AFM with a functionalized tip is given. Perspectives for identifying and characterizing specific individual membrane proteins using AFM in living cells are provided. Given that many diseases have their roots at the molecular scale and are best understood as a malfunctioning biological nanomachines, the prospects of these unique techniques in basic biomedical research or in clinical practice are beyond our imagination. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cellular Biochemistry-
dc.subjectMembrane protein-
dc.subjectSingle molecule recognition-
dc.subjectSensory neuron-
dc.subjectTip functionalization-
dc.subjectAFM-
dc.subjectAT1 receptor-
dc.titleProbing membrane proteins using atomic force microscopy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jcb.20753-
dc.identifier.pmid16440319-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645669939-
dc.identifier.volume97-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1191-
dc.identifier.epage1197-
dc.identifier.eissn1097-4644-

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