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Article: Network domains in social networking sites: expectations, meanings, and social capital

TitleNetwork domains in social networking sites: expectations, meanings, and social capital
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369118X.asp
Citation
Information, Communication and Society, 2016, v. 19 n. 2, p. 188-202 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines why the use of social networking sites (SNSs) leads to different results in cultivating bridging and bonding social capital for different groups of people. Based on in-depth interviews of forty-five university students in Hong Kong, I find that Mainland Chinese students studying in Hong Kong actively use SNSs for seeking practical information about offline matters, and they obtain substantial enacted support from other Mainland students of the same university through SNS use. As a result, they accumulate both bridging and bonding social capital. Local Hong Kong students, however, use SNSs mainly for social information seeking and are only able to accrue limited bridging social capital through SNS use. Drawing on the theory of network domains, I argue that the different offline network structures in which students are located—namely, homogeneous and closed networks versus heterogeneous and open networks—explain this difference. Students with closed offline networks have defined expectations of online ties; they think of their online activities as practical and leading to real changes in their status among peers. Those with open networks have indefinite expectations of their online audience; thus, they interpret online activities differently, thinking of them as recreational, and they are playful in their online behaviour. These different outcomes of online activities consequently lead to diverse results in social capital accrual.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211940
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.109
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.009

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTian, X-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:17:15Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:17:15Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationInformation, Communication and Society, 2016, v. 19 n. 2, p. 188-202-
dc.identifier.issn1369-118X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211940-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines why the use of social networking sites (SNSs) leads to different results in cultivating bridging and bonding social capital for different groups of people. Based on in-depth interviews of forty-five university students in Hong Kong, I find that Mainland Chinese students studying in Hong Kong actively use SNSs for seeking practical information about offline matters, and they obtain substantial enacted support from other Mainland students of the same university through SNS use. As a result, they accumulate both bridging and bonding social capital. Local Hong Kong students, however, use SNSs mainly for social information seeking and are only able to accrue limited bridging social capital through SNS use. Drawing on the theory of network domains, I argue that the different offline network structures in which students are located—namely, homogeneous and closed networks versus heterogeneous and open networks—explain this difference. Students with closed offline networks have defined expectations of online ties; they think of their online activities as practical and leading to real changes in their status among peers. Those with open networks have indefinite expectations of their online audience; thus, they interpret online activities differently, thinking of them as recreational, and they are playful in their online behaviour. These different outcomes of online activities consequently lead to diverse results in social capital accrual.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369118X.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofInformation, Communication and Society-
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [Information, Communication and Society] on [2016], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2015.1050051-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleNetwork domains in social networking sites: expectations, meanings, and social capital-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTian, X: xltian@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, X=rp01543-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1369118X.2015.1050051-
dc.identifier.hkuros244221-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage188-
dc.identifier.epage202-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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