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Book Chapter: The art of losing: Beyond java, patois and postvernacular vitality – Repositioning the periphery in global Asian ecologies

TitleThe art of losing: Beyond java, patois and postvernacular vitality – Repositioning the periphery in global Asian ecologies
Authors
KeywordsEmpowerment
Patois
Peranakans
Postvernacular
Sri Lanka Malay
Issue Date2016
PublisherJohn Benjamins
Citation
The art of losing: Beyond java, patois and postvernacular vitality – Repositioning the periphery in global Asian ecologies. In Filipović, Luna & Pütz, Martin (Eds.), Endangered Languages and Languages in Danger: Issues of documentation, policy, and language rights, p. 283-312. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper discusses issues in endangerment and postvernacularity in the context of Asia, a region with complex dynamics in multilingual ecologies that also includes the presence – dominance – of English, a language that entered the ecologies through colonisation. I use as illustration two minority communities with endangered vernaculars – the Malays of Sri Lanka, brought from various parts of the Malay archipelago by the Dutch and British colonial powers, and their vernacular Sri Lanka Malay, traditionally known as java, a mixed language of trilingual base (Malay, Sinhala, Tamil); and the Peranakans, descendants of southern Chinese merchants who settled in Malaya and intermarried with local women, and their vernacular Baba Malay, a restructured variety of Malay with southern Sinitic influences, usually referred to as patois. I query if linguistic and cultural loss is inevitable, or if such situations of shift – to a language of wider communication or an emergent variety – are in fact instances of empowerment and evolution in response to change, where a repositioning of the periphery in the new global economy brings greater accessibility to and participation in the Centre, and better adaptation for surviving and thriving.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211595
ISBN
Series/Report no.IMPACT: Studies in Language and Society; 42

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLim, LLS-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:04:09Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:04:09Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe art of losing: Beyond java, patois and postvernacular vitality – Repositioning the periphery in global Asian ecologies. In Filipović, Luna & Pütz, Martin (Eds.), Endangered Languages and Languages in Danger: Issues of documentation, policy, and language rights, p. 283-312. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2016-
dc.identifier.isbn9789027258342-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211595-
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses issues in endangerment and postvernacularity in the context of Asia, a region with complex dynamics in multilingual ecologies that also includes the presence – dominance – of English, a language that entered the ecologies through colonisation. I use as illustration two minority communities with endangered vernaculars – the Malays of Sri Lanka, brought from various parts of the Malay archipelago by the Dutch and British colonial powers, and their vernacular Sri Lanka Malay, traditionally known as java, a mixed language of trilingual base (Malay, Sinhala, Tamil); and the Peranakans, descendants of southern Chinese merchants who settled in Malaya and intermarried with local women, and their vernacular Baba Malay, a restructured variety of Malay with southern Sinitic influences, usually referred to as patois. I query if linguistic and cultural loss is inevitable, or if such situations of shift – to a language of wider communication or an emergent variety – are in fact instances of empowerment and evolution in response to change, where a repositioning of the periphery in the new global economy brings greater accessibility to and participation in the Centre, and better adaptation for surviving and thriving.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins-
dc.relation.ispartofEndangered Languages and Languages in Danger: Issues of documentation, policy, and language rights-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIMPACT: Studies in Language and Society; 42-
dc.subjectEmpowerment-
dc.subjectPatois-
dc.subjectPeranakans-
dc.subjectPostvernacular-
dc.subjectSri Lanka Malay-
dc.titleThe art of losing: Beyond java, patois and postvernacular vitality – Repositioning the periphery in global Asian ecologies-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailLim, LLS: lisalim@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLim, LLS=rp01169-
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/impact.42.12lim-
dc.identifier.hkuros245153-
dc.identifier.hkuros269237-
dc.identifier.spage283-
dc.identifier.epage312-
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam ; Philadelphia-

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