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Article: Legal Pluralism, Institutionalism, and Judicial Recognition of Hong Kong-China Cross-Border Insolvency Judgments

TitleLegal Pluralism, Institutionalism, and Judicial Recognition of Hong Kong-China Cross-Border Insolvency Judgments
Authors
KeywordsLegal Pluralism
Institutionalism
Cross-Border Insolvency
Hong Kong
China
Issue Date2015
PublisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/
Citation
Hong Kong Law Journal, 2015, v. 45 n. 1, p. 331-350 How to Cite?
AbstractLegal pluralism and institutionalism are important theoretical underpinnings for the discourses of judicial recognition under dual legal systems that coexist within one sovereign nation such as the case of China and Hong Kong. Institutionalism provides that only formal institutions (eg, constitutions, laws and treaties), unlike informal ones (eg, private contracts, traditions and customs), can facilitate judicial recognition and enforcements for insolvency creditor rights protection. Legal pluralism, however, provides for an alternative to circumventing political sovereignty issues typically associated with the making of treaties for mutual judicial recognition purposes. Under the Chinese politico-legal system, Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region which is akin to a province; as such, Hong Kong is not qualified to sign a bilateral treaty with China. This article expounds and analyses why instituting and implementing a special arrangement (an alternative to a treaty) can help optimise the mutual enforcement of Hong Kong-China cross-border insolvency judgments and orders.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210603
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.215
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, EH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-19T05:01:48Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-19T05:01:48Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Law Journal, 2015, v. 45 n. 1, p. 331-350-
dc.identifier.issn0378-0600-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210603-
dc.description.abstractLegal pluralism and institutionalism are important theoretical underpinnings for the discourses of judicial recognition under dual legal systems that coexist within one sovereign nation such as the case of China and Hong Kong. Institutionalism provides that only formal institutions (eg, constitutions, laws and treaties), unlike informal ones (eg, private contracts, traditions and customs), can facilitate judicial recognition and enforcements for insolvency creditor rights protection. Legal pluralism, however, provides for an alternative to circumventing political sovereignty issues typically associated with the making of treaties for mutual judicial recognition purposes. Under the Chinese politico-legal system, Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region which is akin to a province; as such, Hong Kong is not qualified to sign a bilateral treaty with China. This article expounds and analyses why instituting and implementing a special arrangement (an alternative to a treaty) can help optimise the mutual enforcement of Hong Kong-China cross-border insolvency judgments and orders.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Law Journal-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLegal Pluralism-
dc.subjectInstitutionalism-
dc.subjectCross-Border Insolvency-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.titleLegal Pluralism, Institutionalism, and Judicial Recognition of Hong Kong-China Cross-Border Insolvency Judgments-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, EH: eleelaw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, EH=rp01257-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros242308-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage331-
dc.identifier.epage350-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.identifier.ssrn2606124-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2015/015-

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