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Article: The right to doubt: Climate-change scepticism and asserted rights to private property

TitleThe right to doubt: Climate-change scepticism and asserted rights to private property
Authors
Keywordsclimate-change ethics, coastal erosion
property rights
planned retreat
climate scepticism
climate adaptation
Issue Date2014
Citation
Environmental Politics, 2014, v. 23, n. 4, p. 549-569 How to Cite?
AbstractMany recent planning decisions, such as planned retreat of coastal settlements from the sea, are premised upon the scientific consensus that climate change is real. Not all local residents accept forced relocation, and some hold a radical form of rights-based belief that is hostile to government intervention into private arenas. This 'deontological libertarian' belief is related to a sceptical view of climate science. Data from an Australian survey are employed to demonstrate that climate scepticism is associated with the tendency to see private-property rights as a fundamental entitlement irredeemable in the prospect of forced retreat, regardless of compensation. The sceptical view has defensible normative elements constructed upon the framework of inviolable rights also underpinning recognised environmental and development imperatives. Appealing to absolute rights generally may be an effective way to approach the sceptical public. Rights offer a generalisable framework in which sceptics which they can see how their non-sceptical counterparts are similarly situated despite expressing a different policy preference. Although consensus is not guaranteed, communication can proceed more easily by making a common ontological terrain explicit. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210133
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.164
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.403

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, Alex Y.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-22T06:06:44Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-22T06:06:44Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Politics, 2014, v. 23, n. 4, p. 549-569-
dc.identifier.issn0964-4016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210133-
dc.description.abstractMany recent planning decisions, such as planned retreat of coastal settlements from the sea, are premised upon the scientific consensus that climate change is real. Not all local residents accept forced relocation, and some hold a radical form of rights-based belief that is hostile to government intervention into private arenas. This 'deontological libertarian' belief is related to a sceptical view of climate science. Data from an Australian survey are employed to demonstrate that climate scepticism is associated with the tendency to see private-property rights as a fundamental entitlement irredeemable in the prospect of forced retreat, regardless of compensation. The sceptical view has defensible normative elements constructed upon the framework of inviolable rights also underpinning recognised environmental and development imperatives. Appealing to absolute rights generally may be an effective way to approach the sceptical public. Rights offer a generalisable framework in which sceptics which they can see how their non-sceptical counterparts are similarly situated despite expressing a different policy preference. Although consensus is not guaranteed, communication can proceed more easily by making a common ontological terrain explicit. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Politics-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [Environmental Politics] on [2014], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09644016.2014.884310-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectclimate-change ethics, coastal erosion-
dc.subjectproperty rights-
dc.subjectplanned retreat-
dc.subjectclimate scepticism-
dc.subjectclimate adaptation-
dc.titleThe right to doubt: Climate-change scepticism and asserted rights to private property-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09644016.2014.884310-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84902806712-
dc.identifier.hkuros243557-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage549-
dc.identifier.epage569-
dc.identifier.eissn1743-8934-

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