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Article: Significance of perceived social expectation and implications to conservation education: Turtle conservation as a case study

TitleSignificance of perceived social expectation and implications to conservation education: Turtle conservation as a case study
Authors
KeywordsWildlife conservation
Social expectation
Environmental behavior
China (Guangzhou)
Conservation education
Environmental attitude
Asia
Asian turtles
Issue Date2012
Citation
Environmental Management, 2012, v. 50, n. 5, p. 900-913 How to Cite?
AbstractThe likelihood of participating in wildlife conservation programs is dependent on social influences and circumstances. This view is validated by a case study of behavioral intention to support conservation of Asian turtles. A total of 776 college students in China completed a questionnaire survey designed to identify factors associated with their intention to support conservation. A regression model explained 48 % of variance in the level of intention. Perceived social expectation was the strongest predictor, followed by attitudes toward turtle protection and perceived behavioral control, altogether explaining 44 %. Strong ethics and socio-economic variables had some statistical significant impacts and accounted for 3 % of the variance. The effects of general environmental awareness, trust and responsibility ascription were modest. Knowledge about turtles was a weak predictor. We conclude that perceived social expectation is a limiting factor of conservation behavior. Sustained interest and commitment to conservation can be created by enhancing positive social influences. Conservation educators should explore the potential of professionally supported, group-based actions that can nurture a sense of collective achievement as part of an educational campaign. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210105
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.857
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.830

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, Alex Y.-
dc.contributor.authorChow, Alex T.-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Sze Man-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-22T06:06:39Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-22T06:06:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Management, 2012, v. 50, n. 5, p. 900-913-
dc.identifier.issn0364-152X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210105-
dc.description.abstractThe likelihood of participating in wildlife conservation programs is dependent on social influences and circumstances. This view is validated by a case study of behavioral intention to support conservation of Asian turtles. A total of 776 college students in China completed a questionnaire survey designed to identify factors associated with their intention to support conservation. A regression model explained 48 % of variance in the level of intention. Perceived social expectation was the strongest predictor, followed by attitudes toward turtle protection and perceived behavioral control, altogether explaining 44 %. Strong ethics and socio-economic variables had some statistical significant impacts and accounted for 3 % of the variance. The effects of general environmental awareness, trust and responsibility ascription were modest. Knowledge about turtles was a weak predictor. We conclude that perceived social expectation is a limiting factor of conservation behavior. Sustained interest and commitment to conservation can be created by enhancing positive social influences. Conservation educators should explore the potential of professionally supported, group-based actions that can nurture a sense of collective achievement as part of an educational campaign. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Management-
dc.subjectWildlife conservation-
dc.subjectSocial expectation-
dc.subjectEnvironmental behavior-
dc.subjectChina (Guangzhou)-
dc.subjectConservation education-
dc.subjectEnvironmental attitude-
dc.subjectAsia-
dc.subjectAsian turtles-
dc.titleSignificance of perceived social expectation and implications to conservation education: Turtle conservation as a case study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00267-012-9926-2-
dc.identifier.pmid22961613-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867573832-
dc.identifier.volume50-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage900-
dc.identifier.epage913-
dc.identifier.eissn1432-1009-

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