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Article: What time to adapt? The role of discretionary time in sustaining the climate change value-action gap

TitleWhat time to adapt? The role of discretionary time in sustaining the climate change value-action gap
Authors
KeywordsSustainable consumption practices
Discretionary time
Value-action gap
Issue Date2015
Citation
Ecological Economics, 2015, v. 116, p. 95-107 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Elsevier B.V. The considerable gap between the individuals level of concern about climate change and the degree to which they act on these concerns is a major impediment to achieving more sustainable consumption patterns. We empirically investigate how the amount of discretionary time that individuals have at their disposal influences both what type of sustainable consumption practices they adopt and the size of this value-action gap. We contend that discretionary time has a twofold effect. Given fixed preferences, time-poor individuals tend to satisfy their preferences by adopting sustainable consumption practices that require relatively less time. Moreover, a lack of discretionary time also inhibits agents from developing preferences that actually reflect their underlying environmental concerns. Our findings support both of these hypotheses and suggest that increasing discretionary time is associated with significant reductions in the value-action gap. This suggest that policies which increase discretionary time, such as measures to improve the work-life balance, may thus help in fostering the emergence of pro-environmental preferences among consumers in the long run.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210099
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.227
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.733

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChai, Andreas-
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Graham-
dc.contributor.authorLo, Alex-
dc.contributor.authorReser, Joseph-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-22T06:06:37Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-22T06:06:37Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationEcological Economics, 2015, v. 116, p. 95-107-
dc.identifier.issn0921-8009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210099-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Elsevier B.V. The considerable gap between the individuals level of concern about climate change and the degree to which they act on these concerns is a major impediment to achieving more sustainable consumption patterns. We empirically investigate how the amount of discretionary time that individuals have at their disposal influences both what type of sustainable consumption practices they adopt and the size of this value-action gap. We contend that discretionary time has a twofold effect. Given fixed preferences, time-poor individuals tend to satisfy their preferences by adopting sustainable consumption practices that require relatively less time. Moreover, a lack of discretionary time also inhibits agents from developing preferences that actually reflect their underlying environmental concerns. Our findings support both of these hypotheses and suggest that increasing discretionary time is associated with significant reductions in the value-action gap. This suggest that policies which increase discretionary time, such as measures to improve the work-life balance, may thus help in fostering the emergence of pro-environmental preferences among consumers in the long run.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Economics-
dc.subjectSustainable consumption practices-
dc.subjectDiscretionary time-
dc.subjectValue-action gap-
dc.titleWhat time to adapt? The role of discretionary time in sustaining the climate change value-action gap-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.04.013-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84928662307-
dc.identifier.hkuros243552-
dc.identifier.volume116-
dc.identifier.spage95-
dc.identifier.epage107-

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