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Article: Protest response and willingness to pay for culturally significant urban trees: Implications for Contingent Valuation Method

TitleProtest response and willingness to pay for culturally significant urban trees: Implications for Contingent Valuation Method
Authors
KeywordsEnvironmental valuation
Contingent valuation method
Willingness to pay
Urban trees
Protest response
Hong Kong
Issue Date2015
Citation
Ecological Economics, 2015, v. 114, p. 58-66 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Elsevier B.V. The Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) could assist green-space planning, management and appreciation by assigning a monetary value to urban trees. However, the use of CVM is limited by its inherent methodological weaknesses. A critical concern is the existence of a large proportion of survey respondents providing zero willingness-to-pay (WTP) and that these responses are not amenable to economic theory - known as 'protest' responses. Censoring protest responses from further treatment is a common practice, which warrants reconsideration in light of our CVM survey results. The survey involved 800 residents requested to state their WTP for preserving the culturally significant stonewall trees in urban Hong Kong. About 28% of respondents returned a zero WTP. For all respondents the strength of protest beliefs was assessed, and the relationship between protest beliefs and WTP were examined. Our analysis produced contradictory results: some protest items varied negatively with WTP as expected, but other items increased with it. Respondents' stated positive WTP harbored latent protest beliefs which are related to non-economic preference. The findings stand at odds with the assumptions underlying the censoring treatment and raise questions about the validity of WTP estimates. These methodological implications should be taken into account in using CVM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210094
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.227
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.733

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, Alex Y.-
dc.contributor.authorJim, C. Y.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-22T06:06:36Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-22T06:06:36Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationEcological Economics, 2015, v. 114, p. 58-66-
dc.identifier.issn0921-8009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210094-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Elsevier B.V. The Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) could assist green-space planning, management and appreciation by assigning a monetary value to urban trees. However, the use of CVM is limited by its inherent methodological weaknesses. A critical concern is the existence of a large proportion of survey respondents providing zero willingness-to-pay (WTP) and that these responses are not amenable to economic theory - known as 'protest' responses. Censoring protest responses from further treatment is a common practice, which warrants reconsideration in light of our CVM survey results. The survey involved 800 residents requested to state their WTP for preserving the culturally significant stonewall trees in urban Hong Kong. About 28% of respondents returned a zero WTP. For all respondents the strength of protest beliefs was assessed, and the relationship between protest beliefs and WTP were examined. Our analysis produced contradictory results: some protest items varied negatively with WTP as expected, but other items increased with it. Respondents' stated positive WTP harbored latent protest beliefs which are related to non-economic preference. The findings stand at odds with the assumptions underlying the censoring treatment and raise questions about the validity of WTP estimates. These methodological implications should be taken into account in using CVM.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Economics-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in [Ecological Economics]. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL 114, (2015)] DOI 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.03.012-
dc.subjectEnvironmental valuation-
dc.subjectContingent valuation method-
dc.subjectWillingness to pay-
dc.subjectUrban trees-
dc.subjectProtest response-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.titleProtest response and willingness to pay for culturally significant urban trees: Implications for Contingent Valuation Method-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.03.012-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84925354779-
dc.identifier.hkuros243555-
dc.identifier.volume114-
dc.identifier.spage58-
dc.identifier.epage66-

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