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Conference Paper: Kindred spirits? An investigation into convergence between Sarnami and Sranan in Suriname

TitleKindred spirits? An investigation into convergence between Sarnami and Sranan in Suriname
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherSociety for Caribbean Linguistics.
Citation
The 18th Biennial Conference of the Society for Caribbean Linguistics (SCL 2010), Bridgetown, Barbados, 9-13 August 2010, In Abstracts and Profiles, 2010, p. 80 How to Cite?
AbstractSuriname is known among creolists for an unusually high number of Creole languages, amongst them Sranan and the numerous Maroon Creoles, notably Saramaka and Ndyuka. However, Suriname is characterised by an even more complex contact scenario which involves multiple convergence processes. This process appears to be driven by the emergence of Sranan as a multi-ethnic vernacular diasystem (cf. eg. Charry et al. 1983) and is fed into by various overlapping and mutually reinforcing contact processes. Sarnami, the community language of the Indian-descended population of Suriname is a cornerstone in this contact scenario (cf. Marhé 1985). While it has retained its status as a primarily ...
DescriptionConference Theme: Caribbean Languages and Popular Culture
Session 7: Panel 7B - Syntax 1: no. 42
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210006

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, K-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-18T03:40:44Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-18T03:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationThe 18th Biennial Conference of the Society for Caribbean Linguistics (SCL 2010), Bridgetown, Barbados, 9-13 August 2010, In Abstracts and Profiles, 2010, p. 80-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210006-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Caribbean Languages and Popular Culture-
dc.descriptionSession 7: Panel 7B - Syntax 1: no. 42-
dc.description.abstractSuriname is known among creolists for an unusually high number of Creole languages, amongst them Sranan and the numerous Maroon Creoles, notably Saramaka and Ndyuka. However, Suriname is characterised by an even more complex contact scenario which involves multiple convergence processes. This process appears to be driven by the emergence of Sranan as a multi-ethnic vernacular diasystem (cf. eg. Charry et al. 1983) and is fed into by various overlapping and mutually reinforcing contact processes. Sarnami, the community language of the Indian-descended population of Suriname is a cornerstone in this contact scenario (cf. Marhé 1985). While it has retained its status as a primarily ...-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSociety for Caribbean Linguistics.-
dc.relation.ispartofBiennial Conference of the Society for Caribbean Linguistics, SCL 2010-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleKindred spirits? An investigation into convergence between Sarnami and Sranan in Suriname-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros242546-
dc.identifier.spage80-
dc.identifier.epage80-
dc.publisher.placeBarbados-

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