File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Sparse evidence of MERS-CoV infection among animal workers living in Southern Saudi Arabia during 2012

TitleSparse evidence of MERS-CoV infection among animal workers living in Southern Saudi Arabia during 2012
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, 2015, v. 9 n. 2, p. 64-67 How to Cite?
AbstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging viral pathogen that primarily causes respiratory illness. We conducted a seroprevalence study of banked human serum samples collected in 2012 from Southern Saudi Arabia. Sera from 300 animal workers (17% with daily camel exposure) and 50 non-animal-exposed controls were examined for serological evidence of MERS-CoV infection by a pseudoparticle MERS-CoV spike protein neutralization assay. None of the sera reproducibly neutralized the MERS-CoV-pseudotyped lentiviral vector. These data suggest that serological evidence of zoonotic transmission of MERS-CoV was not common among animal workers in Southern Saudi Arabia during July 2012.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209990

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMemish, ZAen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlsahly, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasri, MAen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeil, GLen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, BDen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorKhan, SUen_US
dc.contributor.authorGray, GCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-18T03:39:18Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-18T03:39:18Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationInfluenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, 2015, v. 9 n. 2, p. 64-67en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209990-
dc.description.abstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging viral pathogen that primarily causes respiratory illness. We conducted a seroprevalence study of banked human serum samples collected in 2012 from Southern Saudi Arabia. Sera from 300 animal workers (17% with daily camel exposure) and 50 non-animal-exposed controls were examined for serological evidence of MERS-CoV infection by a pseudoparticle MERS-CoV spike protein neutralization assay. None of the sera reproducibly neutralized the MERS-CoV-pseudotyped lentiviral vector. These data suggest that serological evidence of zoonotic transmission of MERS-CoV was not common among animal workers in Southern Saudi Arabia during July 2012.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInfluenza and Other Respiratory Virusesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleSparse evidence of MERS-CoV infection among animal workers living in Southern Saudi Arabia during 2012en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/irv.12287en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros243341en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage64en_US
dc.identifier.epage67en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats