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Article: Effectiveness of smoking reduction intervention for hardcore smokers

TitleEffectiveness of smoking reduction intervention for hardcore smokers
Authors
KeywordsHardcore
Cigarette consumption
Quit attempt
Smoking cessation
Smoking reduction
Issue Date2015
Citation
Tobacco Induced Diseases, 2015, v. 13 n. 1, p. 9 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Lam et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: The prevalence and correlates of hardcore smokers, who have high daily cigarette consumption, no quitting history and no intention to quit, have been studied in several western developed countries, but no previous trials of smoking cessation have tested intervention effectiveness for these smokers. The current study examined if hardcore smokers can benefit from smoking reduction intervention to achieve cessation, and explored the underlying reasons. Methods: A posteriori analysis was conducted on data from a randomized controlled trial of smoking reduction intervention on 1,154 smokers who did not want to quit. Odds ratios of 7-day point prevalence of abstinence, smoking reduction by at least 50% and quit attempt at the 6-month follow-up comparing subgroups of smokers were analyzed. Results: In hardcore smokers, the odds ratio comparing the quit rate between the intervention and control group was 4.18 (95% CI: 0.51-34.65), which was greater than non-hardcore smokers (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 0.98-2.54). The number needed to treat for hardcore and non-hardcore smokers was 8.33 (95% CI: 5.56-16.67) and 16.67 (95% CI: 8.33-233.64), respectively. In smokers who did not have quit attempt experience and those who smoked more than 15 cigarettes daily, the odds ratio comparing intervention and control group was 3.29 (95% CI: 0.72-14.98) and 1.36 (95% CI: 0.78-2.36), respectively. Conclusions: The a posteriori analysis provided pilot results that smoking reduction intervention may be effective to help hardcore smokers to quit and reduce smoking. Having no previous quit attempt was identified as more important than having large cigarette consumption in explaining the greater effectiveness of the intervention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209986

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YTDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YPen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdullah, ASMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-18T03:39:17Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-18T03:39:17Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationTobacco Induced Diseases, 2015, v. 13 n. 1, p. 9en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209986-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Lam et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: The prevalence and correlates of hardcore smokers, who have high daily cigarette consumption, no quitting history and no intention to quit, have been studied in several western developed countries, but no previous trials of smoking cessation have tested intervention effectiveness for these smokers. The current study examined if hardcore smokers can benefit from smoking reduction intervention to achieve cessation, and explored the underlying reasons. Methods: A posteriori analysis was conducted on data from a randomized controlled trial of smoking reduction intervention on 1,154 smokers who did not want to quit. Odds ratios of 7-day point prevalence of abstinence, smoking reduction by at least 50% and quit attempt at the 6-month follow-up comparing subgroups of smokers were analyzed. Results: In hardcore smokers, the odds ratio comparing the quit rate between the intervention and control group was 4.18 (95% CI: 0.51-34.65), which was greater than non-hardcore smokers (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 0.98-2.54). The number needed to treat for hardcore and non-hardcore smokers was 8.33 (95% CI: 5.56-16.67) and 16.67 (95% CI: 8.33-233.64), respectively. In smokers who did not have quit attempt experience and those who smoked more than 15 cigarettes daily, the odds ratio comparing intervention and control group was 3.29 (95% CI: 0.72-14.98) and 1.36 (95% CI: 0.78-2.36), respectively. Conclusions: The a posteriori analysis provided pilot results that smoking reduction intervention may be effective to help hardcore smokers to quit and reduce smoking. Having no previous quit attempt was identified as more important than having large cigarette consumption in explaining the greater effectiveness of the intervention.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTobacco Induced Diseasesen_US
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectHardcore-
dc.subjectCigarette consumption-
dc.subjectQuit attempt-
dc.subjectSmoking cessation-
dc.subjectSmoking reduction-
dc.titleEffectiveness of smoking reduction intervention for hardcore smokersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, YTD: takderek@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, YP=rp00465en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12971-015-0034-yen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84926456060-
dc.identifier.hkuros243252en_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage9en_US
dc.identifier.epage9en_US

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