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postgraduate thesis: Self-access language learning : attitudes and learning strategies

TitleSelf-access language learning : attitudes and learning strategies
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Tang, W. [湯偉之]. (2014). Self-access language learning : attitudes and learning strategies. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5396561
AbstractThe attitudes and learning strategies of 100 language learners who are also users of Self-Access Centers (SACs) in a theoretical context of Self-Access Language Learning (SALL). Though questionnaire survey, the present study discovered several significant correlations between learner’s attitudes towards SALL and their language learning strategies. It also established a profile of SALL center users in their attitudes and learning strategies from an comparative view based on their previous SALL experiences. The results showed that leaners who are more ready for Self-Access tend to use affective strategies. Memory strategies are practiced more often among leaners who prefer learn grammar without teachers and have more speaking activities in class, also who are relatively more self-aware of their own learning objectives. Cognitive strategies are widely used by leaners who prefer leaning grammar by themselves, also those who are more confident to solve problems by themselves. There is a stronger intention of control over content selection for leaners who had SALL experiences, especially in utilizing non-staffing SALL resources at SACs.
DegreeMaster of Education
SubjectLanguage acquisition - Ability testing
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209688
HKU Library Item IDb5396561

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Weizhi-
dc.contributor.author湯偉之-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-12T23:13:43Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-12T23:13:43Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationTang, W. [湯偉之]. (2014). Self-access language learning : attitudes and learning strategies. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5396561-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209688-
dc.description.abstractThe attitudes and learning strategies of 100 language learners who are also users of Self-Access Centers (SACs) in a theoretical context of Self-Access Language Learning (SALL). Though questionnaire survey, the present study discovered several significant correlations between learner’s attitudes towards SALL and their language learning strategies. It also established a profile of SALL center users in their attitudes and learning strategies from an comparative view based on their previous SALL experiences. The results showed that leaners who are more ready for Self-Access tend to use affective strategies. Memory strategies are practiced more often among leaners who prefer learn grammar without teachers and have more speaking activities in class, also who are relatively more self-aware of their own learning objectives. Cognitive strategies are widely used by leaners who prefer leaning grammar by themselves, also those who are more confident to solve problems by themselves. There is a stronger intention of control over content selection for leaners who had SALL experiences, especially in utilizing non-staffing SALL resources at SACs.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution-NonCommerical 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshLanguage acquisition - Ability testing-
dc.titleSelf-access language learning : attitudes and learning strategies-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5396561-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Education-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5396561-

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