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Article: Toward a Comprehensive Model of Frailty: An Emerging Concept From the Hong Kong Centenarian Study

TitleToward a Comprehensive Model of Frailty: An Emerging Concept From the Hong Kong Centenarian Study
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association (In press), 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: A better understanding of the essential components of frailty is important for future developments of management strategies. We aimed to assess the incremental validity of a Comprehensive Model of Frailty (CMF) over Frailty Index (FI) in predicting self-rated health and functional dependency amongst near-centenarians and centenarians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, community-based study. SETTING: Two community-based social and clinical networks. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twenty-four community-dwelling Chinese near-centenarians and centenarians. MEASUREMENTS: Frailty was first assessed using a 32-item FI (FI-32). Then, a new CMF was constructed by adding 12 items in the psychological, social/family, environmental, and economic domains to the FI-32. Hierarchical multiple regressions explored whether the new CMF provided significant additional predictive power for self-rated health and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) dependency. RESULTS: Mean age was 97.7 (standard deviation 2.3) years, with a range from 95 to 108, and 74.2% were female. Overall, 16% of our participants were nonfrail, 59% were prefrail, and 25% were frail. Frailty according to FI-32 significantly predicted self-rated health and IADL dependency beyond the effect of age and gender. Inclusion of the new CMF into the regression models provided significant additional predictive power beyond FI-32 on self-rated health, but not IADL dependency. CONCLUSIONS: A CMF should ideally be a multidimensional and multidisciplinary construct including physical, cognitive, functional, psychosocial/family, environmental, and economic factors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209373

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwan, SKJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLAU, HPen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KSLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-17T05:11:42Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-17T05:11:42Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Medical Directors Association (In press), 2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209373-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: A better understanding of the essential components of frailty is important for future developments of management strategies. We aimed to assess the incremental validity of a Comprehensive Model of Frailty (CMF) over Frailty Index (FI) in predicting self-rated health and functional dependency amongst near-centenarians and centenarians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, community-based study. SETTING: Two community-based social and clinical networks. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twenty-four community-dwelling Chinese near-centenarians and centenarians. MEASUREMENTS: Frailty was first assessed using a 32-item FI (FI-32). Then, a new CMF was constructed by adding 12 items in the psychological, social/family, environmental, and economic domains to the FI-32. Hierarchical multiple regressions explored whether the new CMF provided significant additional predictive power for self-rated health and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) dependency. RESULTS: Mean age was 97.7 (standard deviation 2.3) years, with a range from 95 to 108, and 74.2% were female. Overall, 16% of our participants were nonfrail, 59% were prefrail, and 25% were frail. Frailty according to FI-32 significantly predicted self-rated health and IADL dependency beyond the effect of age and gender. Inclusion of the new CMF into the regression models provided significant additional predictive power beyond FI-32 on self-rated health, but not IADL dependency. CONCLUSIONS: A CMF should ideally be a multidimensional and multidisciplinary construct including physical, cognitive, functional, psychosocial/family, environmental, and economic factors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Directors Associationen_US
dc.titleToward a Comprehensive Model of Frailty: An Emerging Concept From the Hong Kong Centenarian Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwan, SKJ: jskkwan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KSL: cslk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwan, SKJ=rp01868en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KSL=rp00615en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jamda.2015.03.005en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242970en_US

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