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Conference Paper: Where is the human nucleus basalis of Meynert?

TitleWhere is the human nucleus basalis of Meynert?
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NAN
Citation
The 116th Meeting of the British Neuropathological Society, London, UK, 4-6 March 2015 . In Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology, 2015, v. 41 n. Suppl. 1, p. 34-35, abstract no. P09 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) is generally defined as the collection of cholinergic neurons located ventral to the anterior commissure. However, detailed anatomical studies on the basal forebrain of the rhesus monkey, using retrograde tracers and cholinergic markers, have revealed a number of different sub-regions that innervate the cortex topographically. It is not known whether this topography translates to the human brain directly and there is a lack of consistency between different studies with regards to the sub-regional anatomy within the human basal forebrain. Therefore, our aim was to simplify and standardise the anatomy of the basal forebrain with a focus on defining the sub-regions of the nbM based on the general consensus in the existing literature. Material and methods: Published literature which included description of the nbM subdivisions was reviewed and 222 basal forebrain sections were obtained from the Parkinson’s UK Tissue bank. Tissues were stained with H&E and immunohistochemistry with choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) for the identification of cholinergic neurons. Key anatomical landmarks were noted and matched with stained tissue sections. Results: Based on the published literature and our own findings, the nbM can be divided into three clear divisions: the anterior nbM is defined by the level of anterior commissure decussation; Intermediate nbM by the splitting of globus pallidus and anterior commissure located ventral to the globus pallidus externa and putamen; and posterior nbM by the level of mammillary body and anterior commissure located ventral/ventrolateral to the putamen. Conclusion: We have established a simplified classification system of the human nbM. This should facilitate further research into clinico-pathological correlations between sub-regional nbM pathology and cognitive deficits found in different neurological disorders.
DescriptionPoster Presentation: Ageing and Neurodegeneration
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209357
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.483
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.859

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_US
dc.contributor.authorPearce, RKBen_US
dc.contributor.authorGentleman, SMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-17T05:10:07Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-17T05:10:07Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 116th Meeting of the British Neuropathological Society, London, UK, 4-6 March 2015 . In Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology, 2015, v. 41 n. Suppl. 1, p. 34-35, abstract no. P09en_US
dc.identifier.issn0305-1846en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209357-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation: Ageing and Neurodegenerationen_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) is generally defined as the collection of cholinergic neurons located ventral to the anterior commissure. However, detailed anatomical studies on the basal forebrain of the rhesus monkey, using retrograde tracers and cholinergic markers, have revealed a number of different sub-regions that innervate the cortex topographically. It is not known whether this topography translates to the human brain directly and there is a lack of consistency between different studies with regards to the sub-regional anatomy within the human basal forebrain. Therefore, our aim was to simplify and standardise the anatomy of the basal forebrain with a focus on defining the sub-regions of the nbM based on the general consensus in the existing literature. Material and methods: Published literature which included description of the nbM subdivisions was reviewed and 222 basal forebrain sections were obtained from the Parkinson’s UK Tissue bank. Tissues were stained with H&E and immunohistochemistry with choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) for the identification of cholinergic neurons. Key anatomical landmarks were noted and matched with stained tissue sections. Results: Based on the published literature and our own findings, the nbM can be divided into three clear divisions: the anterior nbM is defined by the level of anterior commissure decussation; Intermediate nbM by the splitting of globus pallidus and anterior commissure located ventral to the globus pallidus externa and putamen; and posterior nbM by the level of mammillary body and anterior commissure located ventral/ventrolateral to the putamen. Conclusion: We have established a simplified classification system of the human nbM. This should facilitate further research into clinico-pathological correlations between sub-regional nbM pathology and cognitive deficits found in different neurological disorders.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NANen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuropathology and Applied Neurobiologyen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_US
dc.titleWhere is the human nucleus basalis of Meynert?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC: rccchang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242900en_US
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spage34en_US
dc.identifier.epage35en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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