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Article: Current management of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma

TitleCurrent management of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherC M P Medica LLC, The Oncology Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/OCL
Citation
Oncology, 2010, v. 24 n. 4, p. 352-358 How to Cite?
AbstractNasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma--classified as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL), nasal type, by the World Health Organization--is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is almost always associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Up to 75% of ENKTL cases occur in the upper aerodigestive tract, primarily the nasal cavity. It is the most common type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma in many Asian countries. Histologic diagnosis is essential, and staging consists of bilateral bone marrow biopsy and imaging of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. There is a marked dichotomy in treatment and survival between localized and disseminated disease. Since disease incidence is rare even in prevalent areas, experience is limited and most treatment protocols are consensus-guided. ENKTL is both chemosensitive and radiosensitive. Early-stage, localized nasal disease is highly curable with combination therapy, but the optimal dose, combination, and sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are still undefined. For patients with disseminated and extranasal disease, either at initial presentation or at relapse, the prognosis is poor. For disseminated and refractory cases, the 5-year survival rate is below 10%, and better methods of treatment are needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209198
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.967
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.356

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, WY-
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-09T07:12:12Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-09T07:12:12Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationOncology, 2010, v. 24 n. 4, p. 352-358-
dc.identifier.issn0890-9091-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209198-
dc.description.abstractNasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma--classified as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL), nasal type, by the World Health Organization--is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is almost always associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Up to 75% of ENKTL cases occur in the upper aerodigestive tract, primarily the nasal cavity. It is the most common type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma in many Asian countries. Histologic diagnosis is essential, and staging consists of bilateral bone marrow biopsy and imaging of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. There is a marked dichotomy in treatment and survival between localized and disseminated disease. Since disease incidence is rare even in prevalent areas, experience is limited and most treatment protocols are consensus-guided. ENKTL is both chemosensitive and radiosensitive. Early-stage, localized nasal disease is highly curable with combination therapy, but the optimal dose, combination, and sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are still undefined. For patients with disseminated and extranasal disease, either at initial presentation or at relapse, the prognosis is poor. For disseminated and refractory cases, the 5-year survival rate is below 10%, and better methods of treatment are needed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherC M P Medica LLC, The Oncology Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/OCL-
dc.relation.ispartofOncology-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, Extranodal NK-T-Cell -- pathology-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.titleCurrent management of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAu, WY: auwing@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.hkuros180709-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage352-
dc.identifier.epage358-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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