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Article: The evolution of Chinese policies and governance structures on environment, energy and climate

TitleThe evolution of Chinese policies and governance structures on environment, energy and climate
Authors
KeywordsChina
Climate change
Energy
Environment
Policy-making
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-EET.html
Citation
Environmental Policy and Governance, 2010, v. 20 n. 3, p. 180-196 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough a successor to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol has not yet materialized, the 2009 Copenhagen meeting underlined the importance of China in international debates on climate and energy. This is based not only on China's current climate emissions, but also on its expected energy use and economic growth. Within China, climate issues have, like environmental pollution more generally, received increasing government and societal attention, but so has energy – topics that relate to one other but also have different priorities and actor interests behind them. However, while climate change has become more prominent, as shown in the targets included in the current five-year plan, its institutional embeddedness in relation to particularly energy issues has received limited attention. This paper aims to help shed some light on how Chinese policies and governance structures on energy, climate and environment have evolved, particularly considering the roles of national and provincial authorities. Administrative structures and policy-making processes turn out to be very complex, with a range of units and bodies at different levels with distinct responsibilities as well as inter-linkages. Moreover, tensions and conflicts can be found regarding climate change and environmental policies on the one hand, and prevailing objectives to further economic development on the other. Energy policies serve the same economic goals, with climate change being most often operationalized in terms of energy conservation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209177
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.345
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.809

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, SSL-
dc.contributor.authorKolk, A-
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-08T08:19:47Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-08T08:19:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Policy and Governance, 2010, v. 20 n. 3, p. 180-196-
dc.identifier.issn1756-932X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209177-
dc.description.abstractAlthough a successor to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol has not yet materialized, the 2009 Copenhagen meeting underlined the importance of China in international debates on climate and energy. This is based not only on China's current climate emissions, but also on its expected energy use and economic growth. Within China, climate issues have, like environmental pollution more generally, received increasing government and societal attention, but so has energy – topics that relate to one other but also have different priorities and actor interests behind them. However, while climate change has become more prominent, as shown in the targets included in the current five-year plan, its institutional embeddedness in relation to particularly energy issues has received limited attention. This paper aims to help shed some light on how Chinese policies and governance structures on energy, climate and environment have evolved, particularly considering the roles of national and provincial authorities. Administrative structures and policy-making processes turn out to be very complex, with a range of units and bodies at different levels with distinct responsibilities as well as inter-linkages. Moreover, tensions and conflicts can be found regarding climate change and environmental policies on the one hand, and prevailing objectives to further economic development on the other. Energy policies serve the same economic goals, with climate change being most often operationalized in terms of energy conservation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-EET.html-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Policy and Governance-
dc.rightsEnvironmental Policy and Governance. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd..-
dc.rightsSpecial Statement for Preprint only Before publication: 'This is a preprint of an article accepted for publication in [The Journal of Pathology] Copyright © ([year]) ([Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland])'. After publication: the preprint notice should be amended to follows: 'This is a preprint of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Contribution as published in the print edition of the Journal]' For Cochrane Library/ Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, add statement & acknowledgement : ‘This review is published as a Cochrane Review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue X. Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to comments and criticisms, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the Review.’ Please include reference to the Review and hyperlink to the original version using the following format e.g. Authors. Title of Review. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue #. Art. No.: CD00XXXX. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX (insert persistent link to the article by using the URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX) (This statement should refer to the most recent issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in which the Review published.)-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectClimate change-
dc.subjectEnergy-
dc.subjectEnvironment-
dc.subjectPolicy-making-
dc.titleThe evolution of Chinese policies and governance structures on environment, energy and climate-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, SSL: a9604431@graduate.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/eet.540-
dc.identifier.hkuros178882-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage180-
dc.identifier.epage196-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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