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Article: Carcinogens in the indoor air of Hong Kong homes: Levels, sources, and ventilation effects on 7 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

TitleCarcinogens in the indoor air of Hong Kong homes: Levels, sources, and ventilation effects on 7 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons
Authors
KeywordsAir pollution
Indoor
Homes
Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons
Ttobacco smoke
Issue Date1994
PublisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09593330.asp
Citation
Environmental Technology, 1994, v. 15 n. 5, p. 401-418 How to Cite?
AbstractThe concentration of carcinogens in the airborne dust of 33 homes in Hong Kong was studied to identify the sources and measure the amounts of 7 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) including benzo(a)pyrene. The 24 hr samples were collected from kitchens and living rooms of working class homes and analyzed by HPLC. The mean levels of PAH in air and dust were comparatively low, with cooking fires and incense associated with significant increases, and window ventilating fans with significant decreases in PAH concentrations. Perceived pollution sources like water heaters, cigarette smoke, and stir‐fry cooking, led to reduced airborne PAH levels because human responses to these emission sources were to increase natural and mechanical ventilation. The data indicated that compensation behaviours can over‐ride the effects of emission sources, and help explain why measures of increased ventilation from open windows and doors were generally associated with higher PAH levels. The results of this study show that indoor air quality in homes varies with cultural practices, behavioural responses, and climate.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209168
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.76
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.640

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKoo, LCL-
dc.contributor.authorMatsushita, H-
dc.contributor.authorHo, JHC-
dc.contributor.authorWong, MC-
dc.contributor.authorShimizu, H-
dc.contributor.authorMori, T-
dc.contributor.authorMatsuki, H-
dc.contributor.authorTominaga, S-
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-01T08:38:16Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-01T08:38:16Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Technology, 1994, v. 15 n. 5, p. 401-418-
dc.identifier.issn0959-3330-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209168-
dc.description.abstractThe concentration of carcinogens in the airborne dust of 33 homes in Hong Kong was studied to identify the sources and measure the amounts of 7 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) including benzo(a)pyrene. The 24 hr samples were collected from kitchens and living rooms of working class homes and analyzed by HPLC. The mean levels of PAH in air and dust were comparatively low, with cooking fires and incense associated with significant increases, and window ventilating fans with significant decreases in PAH concentrations. Perceived pollution sources like water heaters, cigarette smoke, and stir‐fry cooking, led to reduced airborne PAH levels because human responses to these emission sources were to increase natural and mechanical ventilation. The data indicated that compensation behaviours can over‐ride the effects of emission sources, and help explain why measures of increased ventilation from open windows and doors were generally associated with higher PAH levels. The results of this study show that indoor air quality in homes varies with cultural practices, behavioural responses, and climate.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09593330.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Technology-
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI] -
dc.subjectAir pollution-
dc.subjectIndoor-
dc.subjectHomes-
dc.subjectPolynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons-
dc.subjectTtobacco smoke-
dc.titleCarcinogens in the indoor air of Hong Kong homes: Levels, sources, and ventilation effects on 7 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKoo, LCL: hrmrklc@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09593339409385445-
dc.identifier.hkuros672-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage401-
dc.identifier.epage418-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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