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Article: Demography of Quasipaa frogs in China reveals high vulnerability to widespread harvest pressure

TitleDemography of Quasipaa frogs in China reveals high vulnerability to widespread harvest pressure
Authors
KeywordsAmphibian
China
Harvesting
Population decline
Population viability analysis
Quasipaa
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/biocon
Citation
Biological Conservation, 2014, v. 170 n. 2014, p. 3-9 How to Cite?
AbstractOver 20 species of amphibians are being harvested in Asia with local consumption exceeding the volume of international export in some countries. Over-harvesting is a particular concern for large-bodied species as their life history traits often make them prone to population depletion. Quasipaa spinosa is a large, stream-dwelling frog that is considered a delicacy in China. The demand for its meat is high, with domestic trade amounting to USD 32 m in one province alone in one year. Although it is known that populations of Q. spinosa have been heavily depleted, no information on the demography of wild populations has been available to assess declines and vulnerability to ongoing exploitation. We studied Q. spinosa in Hong Kong, China, where populations are protected from hunting and habitat is largely unaltered. Results from a population viability analysis suggest that these populations are highly vulnerable to hunting activity; hunted populations were associated with much lower expected abundance and substantially higher risk of extirpation than populations free from harvesting pressure. Harvesting confers at least 59% reduction of abundance in 5 years. Based on ongoing harvesting of this species from the wild and our determination that relatively low levels of harvesting can lead to population extirpation in the short term, we call for the establishment of protection measures (State Protected Animal status) for this species throughout China and advocate for strengthened enforcement of existing regulations in nature reserves and other protected areas. Some currently harvested amphibians in China, including other species of Quasipaa, are probably similarly threatened by unregulated harvesting activities and we recommend that their status and vulnerability to harvesting be carefully reviewed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209121
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.985
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.593

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Hon-ki-
dc.contributor.authorShoemaker, KT-
dc.contributor.authorKarraker, NE-
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-30T06:25:23Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-30T06:25:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationBiological Conservation, 2014, v. 170 n. 2014, p. 3-9-
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209121-
dc.description.abstractOver 20 species of amphibians are being harvested in Asia with local consumption exceeding the volume of international export in some countries. Over-harvesting is a particular concern for large-bodied species as their life history traits often make them prone to population depletion. Quasipaa spinosa is a large, stream-dwelling frog that is considered a delicacy in China. The demand for its meat is high, with domestic trade amounting to USD 32 m in one province alone in one year. Although it is known that populations of Q. spinosa have been heavily depleted, no information on the demography of wild populations has been available to assess declines and vulnerability to ongoing exploitation. We studied Q. spinosa in Hong Kong, China, where populations are protected from hunting and habitat is largely unaltered. Results from a population viability analysis suggest that these populations are highly vulnerable to hunting activity; hunted populations were associated with much lower expected abundance and substantially higher risk of extirpation than populations free from harvesting pressure. Harvesting confers at least 59% reduction of abundance in 5 years. Based on ongoing harvesting of this species from the wild and our determination that relatively low levels of harvesting can lead to population extirpation in the short term, we call for the establishment of protection measures (State Protected Animal status) for this species throughout China and advocate for strengthened enforcement of existing regulations in nature reserves and other protected areas. Some currently harvested amphibians in China, including other species of Quasipaa, are probably similarly threatened by unregulated harvesting activities and we recommend that their status and vulnerability to harvesting be carefully reviewed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/biocon-
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Conservation-
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Biological Conservation. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Biological Conservation [VOL 170, ISSUE 2014, 2014] DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2013.12.014-
dc.subjectAmphibian-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectHarvesting-
dc.subjectPopulation decline-
dc.subjectPopulation viability analysis-
dc.subjectQuasipaa-
dc.titleDemography of Quasipaa frogs in China reveals high vulnerability to widespread harvest pressure-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKarraker, NE: karraker@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKarraker, NE=rp00714-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2013.12.014-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84893172151-
dc.identifier.volume170-
dc.identifier.issue2014-
dc.identifier.spage3-
dc.identifier.epage9-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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