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Article: Dettol poisoning and the need for airway intervention

TitleDettol poisoning and the need for airway intervention
Authors
KeywordsChloroxylenol
Disinfectants/poisoning
Intratracheal
Intubation
Risk factors
Issue Date2012
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2012, v. 18, n. 4, p. 270-275 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives To (1) characterise the clinical features of Dettol poisoning on a territory-wide basis, (2) assess the need for airway intervention after such poisoning and its time frame after ingestion, and (3) identify predictors for such an intervention. Design Case series. Setting Sixteen accident and emergency departments in Hong Kong. Patients Patients with Dettol ingestion who presented within 48 hours of ingestion from July 2005 to June 2009, derived from the database of the Hong Kong Poison Information Centre. Results In all, 213 patient records were identified, of which 36 were excluded based on pre-defined criteria and 177 were analysed. Among the latter, the median age was 32 (range, 2-95) years and the male-to-female ratio was 1:2.7 (48:129). Intentional ingestion constituted the majority (95%) of cases. The most common symptoms were related to the local irritative/corrosive effects on the aero-digestive tract, such as gastro-intestinal upset and localised throat pain. Airway intervention was required in 14 (8%) patients. All interventions were performed within 12 hours of Dettol ingestion and three cases involved re-intubation after extubation. Univariate analysis showed that a Glasgow Coma Scale score of <8, older age, a larger amount ingested, lip swelling, lung crackles, and wheezing were all associated with airway intervention. In the multivariate analysis using forward stepwise logistic regression, only coma (Glasgow Coma Scale score of <8) remained statistically significant. Conclusions Delayed airway obstruction (>12 hours after Dettol ingestion) is unlikely. For those who are intubated, careful assessment of airway adequacy before extubation is strongly recommended to avoid extubation failure and subsequent re-intubation. Patients in coma (Glasgow Coma Scale score of <8) should prompt airway intervention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208947
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Pui Kin-
dc.contributor.authorChan Dr., C. K.-
dc.contributor.authorTse, Manli-
dc.contributor.authorLau, Feilung-
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-23T02:02:19Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-23T02:02:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2012, v. 18, n. 4, p. 270-275-
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208947-
dc.description.abstractObjectives To (1) characterise the clinical features of Dettol poisoning on a territory-wide basis, (2) assess the need for airway intervention after such poisoning and its time frame after ingestion, and (3) identify predictors for such an intervention. Design Case series. Setting Sixteen accident and emergency departments in Hong Kong. Patients Patients with Dettol ingestion who presented within 48 hours of ingestion from July 2005 to June 2009, derived from the database of the Hong Kong Poison Information Centre. Results In all, 213 patient records were identified, of which 36 were excluded based on pre-defined criteria and 177 were analysed. Among the latter, the median age was 32 (range, 2-95) years and the male-to-female ratio was 1:2.7 (48:129). Intentional ingestion constituted the majority (95%) of cases. The most common symptoms were related to the local irritative/corrosive effects on the aero-digestive tract, such as gastro-intestinal upset and localised throat pain. Airway intervention was required in 14 (8%) patients. All interventions were performed within 12 hours of Dettol ingestion and three cases involved re-intubation after extubation. Univariate analysis showed that a Glasgow Coma Scale score of <8, older age, a larger amount ingested, lip swelling, lung crackles, and wheezing were all associated with airway intervention. In the multivariate analysis using forward stepwise logistic regression, only coma (Glasgow Coma Scale score of <8) remained statistically significant. Conclusions Delayed airway obstruction (>12 hours after Dettol ingestion) is unlikely. For those who are intubated, careful assessment of airway adequacy before extubation is strongly recommended to avoid extubation failure and subsequent re-intubation. Patients in coma (Glasgow Coma Scale score of <8) should prompt airway intervention.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal-
dc.subjectChloroxylenol-
dc.subjectDisinfectants/poisoning-
dc.subjectIntratracheal-
dc.subjectIntubation-
dc.subjectRisk factors-
dc.titleDettol poisoning and the need for airway intervention-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid22865169-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865735507-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage270-
dc.identifier.epage275-

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