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postgraduate thesis: Reuglation of T helper 17 by bacteria : an approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

TitleReuglation of T helper 17 by bacteria : an approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Sung, Y. C. [宋穎如]. (2014). Reuglation of T helper 17 by bacteria : an approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5387993
AbstractHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. It is a disease with poor prognosis with unsatisfactory long-term survival of patients, and thus new strategies to control this disease are warranted. T helper (Th) 17 cells and IL-17 have recently been detected with increased frequency in a number of tumors including HCC. Its role in tumor remains controversial but its presence in HCC has been linked to disease progression, possibly involving angiogenesis. Th17 cells could be homed to inflammatory sites such as tumor microenvironment via CCR6/CCL20 axis and expand locally, and studies from other inflammatory diseases such as autoimmune disease has shown that the gut is the potential source of Th17, where its induction is affected by signals from gut microbiota. Yet this link is not yet shown in extra-intestinal tumors. Probiotics are living microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. They have been reported to relieve chronic inflammatory diseases in animal and in human intervention studies. It is believed that probiotics regulate signals to gut antigen-presenting cells, which act as the pivot in modulating the systemic immune responses and inactivated bacteria also exhibited immunomodulatory effects in this regard. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that oral feeding of probiotics to HCCbearing animals may affect Th17 polarization and distribution and thereby modulate tumor microenvironment, which may have beneficial effect in tumor development, possibly via affecting angiogenesis. To address this hypothesis, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed with different heat-inactivated or viable probiotics– Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), VSL#3 or mixture of probiotics − Prohep (heat-inactivated LGG, heatinactivated VSL#3 and viable EcN) either one week in advance or at the time of subcutaneous tumor inoculation. Probiotic feeding had improved survival in tumor-bearing mice, slowed down tumor growth and reduced tumor burden when monitored for 38 days. Probiotics showed better efficacy when feeding was given in advance. The anti-tumor effect was related to reduced angiogenesis and reduced IL-17 serum and gene expression within tumor. The mechanistic link between IL-17 modulation and tumor development was further studied in animals by IL-17 neutralization. The anti-tumor efficacy of probiotics, in relation to tumor growth and angiogenesis, was lost after IL-17 neutralization, which was linked to recruitment of myeloid suppressor cells. Since cells from both adaptive and innate immune systems could secrete IL-17, the source of IL-17 production was then identified, and found that Th17 was the major IL-17 secretor being modulated by probiotic feeding. Reduced homing of Th17 to tumor via circulation, with a tendency being recruited from gut was observed. Probiotics-mediated Th17 cell modulation in the gut by inducing the skewing of IL-10 secreting type1 regulatory T cells via dendritic cells may link to limited IL-17 mediated angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. With better understanding of the immunomodulation properties of probiotics, prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy in management of other inflammation-associated cancer can be availed.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectT cells
Liver - Cancer - Treatment
Dept/ProgramBiological Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208577

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSung, Ying-ju, Cecilia-
dc.contributor.author宋穎如-
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-13T01:44:00Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-13T01:44:00Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationSung, Y. C. [宋穎如]. (2014). Reuglation of T helper 17 by bacteria : an approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5387993-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208577-
dc.description.abstractHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. It is a disease with poor prognosis with unsatisfactory long-term survival of patients, and thus new strategies to control this disease are warranted. T helper (Th) 17 cells and IL-17 have recently been detected with increased frequency in a number of tumors including HCC. Its role in tumor remains controversial but its presence in HCC has been linked to disease progression, possibly involving angiogenesis. Th17 cells could be homed to inflammatory sites such as tumor microenvironment via CCR6/CCL20 axis and expand locally, and studies from other inflammatory diseases such as autoimmune disease has shown that the gut is the potential source of Th17, where its induction is affected by signals from gut microbiota. Yet this link is not yet shown in extra-intestinal tumors. Probiotics are living microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. They have been reported to relieve chronic inflammatory diseases in animal and in human intervention studies. It is believed that probiotics regulate signals to gut antigen-presenting cells, which act as the pivot in modulating the systemic immune responses and inactivated bacteria also exhibited immunomodulatory effects in this regard. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that oral feeding of probiotics to HCCbearing animals may affect Th17 polarization and distribution and thereby modulate tumor microenvironment, which may have beneficial effect in tumor development, possibly via affecting angiogenesis. To address this hypothesis, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed with different heat-inactivated or viable probiotics– Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), VSL#3 or mixture of probiotics − Prohep (heat-inactivated LGG, heatinactivated VSL#3 and viable EcN) either one week in advance or at the time of subcutaneous tumor inoculation. Probiotic feeding had improved survival in tumor-bearing mice, slowed down tumor growth and reduced tumor burden when monitored for 38 days. Probiotics showed better efficacy when feeding was given in advance. The anti-tumor effect was related to reduced angiogenesis and reduced IL-17 serum and gene expression within tumor. The mechanistic link between IL-17 modulation and tumor development was further studied in animals by IL-17 neutralization. The anti-tumor efficacy of probiotics, in relation to tumor growth and angiogenesis, was lost after IL-17 neutralization, which was linked to recruitment of myeloid suppressor cells. Since cells from both adaptive and innate immune systems could secrete IL-17, the source of IL-17 production was then identified, and found that Th17 was the major IL-17 secretor being modulated by probiotic feeding. Reduced homing of Th17 to tumor via circulation, with a tendency being recruited from gut was observed. Probiotics-mediated Th17 cell modulation in the gut by inducing the skewing of IL-10 secreting type1 regulatory T cells via dendritic cells may link to limited IL-17 mediated angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. With better understanding of the immunomodulation properties of probiotics, prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy in management of other inflammation-associated cancer can be availed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshT cells-
dc.subject.lcshLiver - Cancer - Treatment-
dc.titleReuglation of T helper 17 by bacteria : an approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5387993-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineBiological Sciences-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5387993-

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