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Article: Saints for Shamans? Culture, religion and borderland politics in Amuria from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries

TitleSaints for Shamans? Culture, religion and borderland politics in Amuria from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherHarrassowitz Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.harrassowitz-verlag.de/sequence_567.ahtml
Citation
Central Asiatic Journal, 2012-2013, v. 56, n. 2, p. 169-202 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines how the Qing state imagined the political incursion of Russian culture in the Amur River basin, a disputed borderland with the Russian empire. The Qing administration was apprehensive about signs that the indigenes of this area were embracing Russian material customs, and that these people would be more open to Russian control. Conversion to Russian Orthodoxy, despite a relative lack of missionary activity, and thus submission to foreign religious authorities, were also regarded as a threat. Such concerns were seen as detrimental to the Qing and as strengthening St Petersburg's claim over the Amur. Such anxieties were expressed both in the folk culture of the Amur River indigenes (Orochen, Dagur) as well as in official Qing documents. This article will also seek to contextualize the Amur civilisations in a broader debate involving Orthodox faith, "Russian culture" and cultural imperialism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207933
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.102

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKim, LE-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-26T11:46:44Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-26T11:46:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationCentral Asiatic Journal, 2012-2013, v. 56, n. 2, p. 169-202-
dc.identifier.issn0008-9192-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207933-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines how the Qing state imagined the political incursion of Russian culture in the Amur River basin, a disputed borderland with the Russian empire. The Qing administration was apprehensive about signs that the indigenes of this area were embracing Russian material customs, and that these people would be more open to Russian control. Conversion to Russian Orthodoxy, despite a relative lack of missionary activity, and thus submission to foreign religious authorities, were also regarded as a threat. Such concerns were seen as detrimental to the Qing and as strengthening St Petersburg's claim over the Amur. Such anxieties were expressed both in the folk culture of the Amur River indigenes (Orochen, Dagur) as well as in official Qing documents. This article will also seek to contextualize the Amur civilisations in a broader debate involving Orthodox faith, "Russian culture" and cultural imperialism.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHarrassowitz Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.harrassowitz-verlag.de/sequence_567.ahtml-
dc.relation.ispartofCentral Asiatic Journal-
dc.titleSaints for Shamans? Culture, religion and borderland politics in Amuria from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84901475583-
dc.identifier.hkuros246393-
dc.identifier.volume56-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage169-
dc.identifier.epage202-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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