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Conference Paper: Managing stormwater with low impact development in highly urbanized areas

TitleManaging stormwater with low impact development in highly urbanized areas
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
The 2014 International Conference of the Drainage Services Department (DSD) of the HKSAR Government (DSDIC 2014), Hong Kong, 12-14 November 2014, paper A2-2 How to Cite?
AbstractLow impact development (LID) implements small-scale hydrologic controls throughout a catchment to replicate the pre-development hydrologic regimes or in other terms control stormwater as close to the source as possible. Examples of such controls include green roofs, bioretention swales, rain gardens, porous pavements. This project evaluates the effectiveness of large-scale LID implementation in Singapore and Hong Kong. We examine the hydrologic impacts, namely peak discharge mitigation and baseflow restoration, under different land uses, rainfall conditions and LID strategies. For further comparison, we adopt an integrated distributed hydrological model for Singapore and a lumped hydraulic model for Hong Kong. Studies of both Singapore and Hong Kong suggest that LID is effective if there is substantial level of infrastructures (e.g., covering 5 to 10% of catchment area). LID is more efficient in reducing/delaying peak discharge and restoring baseflow on an average long term basis. However, its performance, particularly in peak discharge mitigation, diminishes during design storms (e.g., ARI of 5 years). In terms of modeling techniques, integrated distributed hydrologic models require extensive parameterization but can accurately simulate some important processes (e.g., increase of infiltration and restoration of baseflow) that are simplified in lumped hydraulic models. Overall, large-scale LID potentially provides more sustainable stormwater management but its success depends on factors such as design objectives, existing land uses and drainage networks. We should therefore further research to increase the feasibility of large-scale LID in highly urbanized areas such as Singapore and Hong Kong.
Description2014 is the 25th Anniverssary of the Drainage Services Department (DSD) of the HKSAR Government
Paper A2-2
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207811

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChui, MTF-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, H-
dc.contributor.authorTrinh, DH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-19T10:57:31Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-19T10:57:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 International Conference of the Drainage Services Department (DSD) of the HKSAR Government (DSDIC 2014), Hong Kong, 12-14 November 2014, paper A2-2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207811-
dc.description2014 is the 25th Anniverssary of the Drainage Services Department (DSD) of the HKSAR Government-
dc.descriptionPaper A2-2-
dc.description.abstractLow impact development (LID) implements small-scale hydrologic controls throughout a catchment to replicate the pre-development hydrologic regimes or in other terms control stormwater as close to the source as possible. Examples of such controls include green roofs, bioretention swales, rain gardens, porous pavements. This project evaluates the effectiveness of large-scale LID implementation in Singapore and Hong Kong. We examine the hydrologic impacts, namely peak discharge mitigation and baseflow restoration, under different land uses, rainfall conditions and LID strategies. For further comparison, we adopt an integrated distributed hydrological model for Singapore and a lumped hydraulic model for Hong Kong. Studies of both Singapore and Hong Kong suggest that LID is effective if there is substantial level of infrastructures (e.g., covering 5 to 10% of catchment area). LID is more efficient in reducing/delaying peak discharge and restoring baseflow on an average long term basis. However, its performance, particularly in peak discharge mitigation, diminishes during design storms (e.g., ARI of 5 years). In terms of modeling techniques, integrated distributed hydrologic models require extensive parameterization but can accurately simulate some important processes (e.g., increase of infiltration and restoration of baseflow) that are simplified in lumped hydraulic models. Overall, large-scale LID potentially provides more sustainable stormwater management but its success depends on factors such as design objectives, existing land uses and drainage networks. We should therefore further research to increase the feasibility of large-scale LID in highly urbanized areas such as Singapore and Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHKSAR Government DSD International Conference, DSDIC 2014-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleManaging stormwater with low impact development in highly urbanized areas-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailChui, MTF: maychui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChui, MTF=rp01696-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros242238-

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