File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The effects of hyperuricaemia on flow-mediated and nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation in high-risk patients

TitleThe effects of hyperuricaemia on flow-mediated and nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation in high-risk patients
Authors
KeywordsEndothelial function
Flow-mediated dilatation
Hyperuricaemia
Nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation
Uric acid
Vascular smooth muscle cells
Issue Date2014
Citation
Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, 2014, v. 24 n. 9, p. 1012-1019 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND AND AIMS: Uric acid is emerging as one of the newer risk markers to consider in the cardiovascular risk assessment because it is demonstrated to be associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, particularly in high cardiovascular risk patients. One of the proposed mechanisms involving hyperuricaemia is the development of vascular damage. The aim of this study is to examine the role of hyperuricaemia on vascular function in patients with high cardiovascular risk. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the clinical significance of hyperuricaemia in relation to vasomotor response of the brachial artery by using high-resolution ultrasound in 304 subjects with coronary artery disease and/or diabetes. Nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NMD) was significantly lower in the hyperuricaemic group compared with the normouricaemic group (12.8 +/- 6.9% vs. 16.2 +/- 7.7%, p < 0.001), but no significant difference was observed in flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) between the two groups [3.78 (95% CR: 1.5-9.9) vs. 3.88 (95% CR: -2.6 to 9.9), p = 0.78]. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that smoking was the strongest predictor of FMD (b = -0.81, p = 0.02); and that smoking (b = -2.62, p = 0.003), SBP (b = -0.11, p = 0.001), hyperuricaemia (b = -2.11, p = 0.02) and use of nitrates (b = -3.30, p = 0.001) were independent predictors of NMD. CONCLUSION: High cardiovascular risk patients with hyperuricaemia had a lower NMD than those with normouricaemia. Importantly, hyperuricaemia was independently associated with NMD after multivariable adjustments. To further understand the pathophysiological mechanisms involving hyperuricaemia, particularly in the context of impaired NMD, further experimental and clinical studies are needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207699
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.39
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.558

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhen, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiu, DCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, KHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-19T04:20:36Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-19T04:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationNutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, 2014, v. 24 n. 9, p. 1012-1019en_US
dc.identifier.issn0939-4753en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207699-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND AIMS: Uric acid is emerging as one of the newer risk markers to consider in the cardiovascular risk assessment because it is demonstrated to be associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, particularly in high cardiovascular risk patients. One of the proposed mechanisms involving hyperuricaemia is the development of vascular damage. The aim of this study is to examine the role of hyperuricaemia on vascular function in patients with high cardiovascular risk. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the clinical significance of hyperuricaemia in relation to vasomotor response of the brachial artery by using high-resolution ultrasound in 304 subjects with coronary artery disease and/or diabetes. Nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NMD) was significantly lower in the hyperuricaemic group compared with the normouricaemic group (12.8 +/- 6.9% vs. 16.2 +/- 7.7%, p < 0.001), but no significant difference was observed in flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) between the two groups [3.78 (95% CR: 1.5-9.9) vs. 3.88 (95% CR: -2.6 to 9.9), p = 0.78]. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that smoking was the strongest predictor of FMD (b = -0.81, p = 0.02); and that smoking (b = -2.62, p = 0.003), SBP (b = -0.11, p = 0.001), hyperuricaemia (b = -2.11, p = 0.02) and use of nitrates (b = -3.30, p = 0.001) were independent predictors of NMD. CONCLUSION: High cardiovascular risk patients with hyperuricaemia had a lower NMD than those with normouricaemia. Importantly, hyperuricaemia was independently associated with NMD after multivariable adjustments. To further understand the pathophysiological mechanisms involving hyperuricaemia, particularly in the context of impaired NMD, further experimental and clinical studies are needed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseasesen_US
dc.subjectEndothelial functionen_US
dc.subjectFlow-mediated dilatationen_US
dc.subjectHyperuricaemiaen_US
dc.subjectNitroglycerin-mediated dilatationen_US
dc.subjectUric aciden_US
dc.subjectVascular smooth muscle cellsen_US
dc.titleThe effects of hyperuricaemia on flow-mediated and nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation in high-risk patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, KH: khkyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, KH=rp01490en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.numecd.2014.02.006en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24680223-
dc.identifier.hkuros249583-
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage1012en_US
dc.identifier.epage1019en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats