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Article: Worsened arterial stiffness in high-risk cardiovascular patients with high habitual carbohydrate intake: a cross-sectional vascular function study

TitleWorsened arterial stiffness in high-risk cardiovascular patients with high habitual carbohydrate intake: a cross-sectional vascular function study
Authors
KeywordsAged
Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis/*etiology/physiopathology
Case-Control Studies
China
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates/*adverse effects
Energy Intake
Female
*Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Pulse Wave Analysis
Questionnaires
Risk Factors
*Vascular Stiffness
Issue Date2014
Citation
BMC Cardiovasc Disord, 2014, v. 14, p. 24-24 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested that high dietary carbohydrate intake is associated with increased cardiovascular risk through raised triglyceride and decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. However, the relation between carbohydrate intake and arterial stiffness has not been established. The purpose of this study was to examine this relation among high-risk cardiovascular patients. METHODS: We studied the relation between dietary macronutrient intake and arterial stiffness in 364 patients with documented cardiovascular diseases or risk equivalent (coronary artery diseases 62%, ischemic stroke 13%, diabetes mellitus 55%) and in 93 age-and-sex matched control subjects. Dietary macronutrient intake was assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for Chinese. Heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured non-invasively with a Vascular Profiling System (VP2000, Colin Corp. USA). A dietary pattern with >/=60% total energy intake derived from carbohydrates was defined as a high-carbohydrate diet according to the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for Chinese. RESULTS: Subjects who consumed a high-carbohydrate diet had significantly higher mean PWV than those who did not consume a high-carbohydrate diet (P = 0.039). After adjustment for potential confounders, high-carbohydrate diet was associated with significantly increased PWV [B = 73.50 (10.81 to 136.19), P = 0.022]. However, there was no significant association between high-carbohydrate diet and PWV in controls (P = 0.634). CONCLUSIONS: High-carbohydrate diet is associated with increased arterial stiffness in patients with established cardiovascular disease or risk equivalent.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207689
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.916
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.023

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, HTen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, YHen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, SWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, CPen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-19T04:20:03Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-19T04:20:03Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Cardiovasc Disord, 2014, v. 14, p. 24-24en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2261en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207689-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested that high dietary carbohydrate intake is associated with increased cardiovascular risk through raised triglyceride and decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. However, the relation between carbohydrate intake and arterial stiffness has not been established. The purpose of this study was to examine this relation among high-risk cardiovascular patients. METHODS: We studied the relation between dietary macronutrient intake and arterial stiffness in 364 patients with documented cardiovascular diseases or risk equivalent (coronary artery diseases 62%, ischemic stroke 13%, diabetes mellitus 55%) and in 93 age-and-sex matched control subjects. Dietary macronutrient intake was assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for Chinese. Heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured non-invasively with a Vascular Profiling System (VP2000, Colin Corp. USA). A dietary pattern with >/=60% total energy intake derived from carbohydrates was defined as a high-carbohydrate diet according to the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for Chinese. RESULTS: Subjects who consumed a high-carbohydrate diet had significantly higher mean PWV than those who did not consume a high-carbohydrate diet (P = 0.039). After adjustment for potential confounders, high-carbohydrate diet was associated with significantly increased PWV [B = 73.50 (10.81 to 136.19), P = 0.022]. However, there was no significant association between high-carbohydrate diet and PWV in controls (P = 0.634). CONCLUSIONS: High-carbohydrate diet is associated with increased arterial stiffness in patients with established cardiovascular disease or risk equivalent.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Cardiovasc Disorden_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis/*etiology/physiopathologyen_US
dc.subjectCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subjectDietary Carbohydrates/*adverse effectsen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Intakeen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subject*Food Habitsen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subjectNutritional Statusen_US
dc.subjectPulse Wave Analysisen_US
dc.subjectQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject*Vascular Stiffnessen_US
dc.titleWorsened arterial stiffness in high-risk cardiovascular patients with high habitual carbohydrate intake: a cross-sectional vascular function studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, KH: khkyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, KH=rp01490en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2261-14-24en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros253825-
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.spage24en_US
dc.identifier.epage24en_US

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