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Article: Clinical experience in managing pediatric patients with ultra-short bowel syndrome using Omega-3 fatty acid

TitleClinical experience in managing pediatric patients with ultra-short bowel syndrome using Omega-3 fatty acid
Authors
KeywordsFatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Infant, Newborn
Short Bowel Syndrome - drug therapy
Treatment Outcome
Humans
Issue Date2010
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at www.thieme.com/ejps
Citation
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 2010, v. 20 n. 2, p. 139-142 How to Cite?
AbstractTotal parenteral nutrition (TPN) remains an important component of the management of short bowl syndrome in pediatric patients. However, prolonged TPN is known to be associated with cholestasis. Recently, the use of omega-3-fatty acid (Omegaven) has been proposed to improve TPN cholestasis. We present the early outcome after administration of Omegaven in four patients with ultra-short bowel syndrome. Based on our experience, it appears that omega-3 fatty acid can reverse and prevent the advent of TPN-related cholestasis, thereby significantly improving the process of intestinal adaptation. We suggest that clinicians consider this treatment option before proceeding to invasive surgery to reverse cholestasis. Prospective randomized trials are necessary to define a standard protocol and elucidate other potential benefits of this novel agent.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207588
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.450

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, HY-
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKY-
dc.contributor.authorWong, RMS-
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, NS-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KL-
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-09T07:17:52Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-09T07:17:52Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 2010, v. 20 n. 2, p. 139-142-
dc.identifier.issn0939-7248-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207588-
dc.description.abstractTotal parenteral nutrition (TPN) remains an important component of the management of short bowl syndrome in pediatric patients. However, prolonged TPN is known to be associated with cholestasis. Recently, the use of omega-3-fatty acid (Omegaven) has been proposed to improve TPN cholestasis. We present the early outcome after administration of Omegaven in four patients with ultra-short bowel syndrome. Based on our experience, it appears that omega-3 fatty acid can reverse and prevent the advent of TPN-related cholestasis, thereby significantly improving the process of intestinal adaptation. We suggest that clinicians consider this treatment option before proceeding to invasive surgery to reverse cholestasis. Prospective randomized trials are necessary to define a standard protocol and elucidate other potential benefits of this novel agent.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at www.thieme.com/ejps-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Pediatric Surgery-
dc.rightsEuropean Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.-
dc.subjectFatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage-
dc.subjectInfant, Newborn-
dc.subjectShort Bowel Syndrome - drug therapy-
dc.subjectTreatment Outcome-
dc.subjectHumans-
dc.titleClinical experience in managing pediatric patients with ultra-short bowel syndrome using Omega-3 fatty aciden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, KKY: kkywong@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, RMS: wongmsr@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsoi, NS: tsoins@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KL: klchan@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTam, PKH: paultam@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0029-1238283-
dc.identifier.pmid20178080-
dc.identifier.hkuros170338-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage139-
dc.identifier.epage142-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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