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Article: Aestheticisation, rent-seeking, and rural gentrification amidst China's rapid urbanisation: The case of Xiaozhou village, Guangzhou

TitleAestheticisation, rent-seeking, and rural gentrification amidst China's rapid urbanisation: The case of Xiaozhou village, Guangzhou
Authors
KeywordsCommodification
Rent-seeking
Rural gentrification
Post-socialist China
Aestheticisation
Counter-urbanisation
Issue Date2013
Citation
Journal of Rural Studies, 2013, v. 32, p. 331-345 How to Cite?
AbstractAmidst China's immense and rapid urbanisation, gentrification has spread from urban centres to peri-urban and rural areas. Employing an analytical perspective built from the literatures on counter-urbanisation, rural immigration and rural gentrification, this study examines the two-stage gentrification processes in Xiaozhou village, Guangzhou, China. Situating rural gentrification in Xiaozhou against broader backdrops - such as urbanisation in Guangzhou and the preservation regulations imposed by the local state - this article unveils the ways in which interplays between the aestheticisation of rural living and indigenous villagers' rent-seeking behaviour fostered rural immigration and gentrification. In Xiaozhou, grassroots artists' aestheticisation and colonisation of the village ignited an initial stage of gentrification. The subsequent commodification of rural land and housing, induced by increasing concentration of art students and middle class "elite artists", led to deepened gentrification, studentification and eventually displacement of pioneer gentrifiers. In this process, local villagers' rent-seeking behaviour went hand in hand with aestheticisation and commodification of rural space. This finding questions the representations of victimised local rural residents in much of Western literature on rural gentrification. The special role played by the government policy and institutional arrangement in the stories of Xiaozhou also has the potential to add a new dimension to rural gentrification explanations. In sum, this paper shows that explanations of the perplexing dynamics of rural immigration and gentrification can benefit from more flexible and fluid conceptualisations of "gentrifiers" and "gentrification" as a whole. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207531
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.206
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.284

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQian, Junxi-
dc.contributor.authorHe, Shenjing-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Lin-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-31T01:01:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-31T01:01:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Rural Studies, 2013, v. 32, p. 331-345-
dc.identifier.issn0743-0167-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207531-
dc.description.abstractAmidst China's immense and rapid urbanisation, gentrification has spread from urban centres to peri-urban and rural areas. Employing an analytical perspective built from the literatures on counter-urbanisation, rural immigration and rural gentrification, this study examines the two-stage gentrification processes in Xiaozhou village, Guangzhou, China. Situating rural gentrification in Xiaozhou against broader backdrops - such as urbanisation in Guangzhou and the preservation regulations imposed by the local state - this article unveils the ways in which interplays between the aestheticisation of rural living and indigenous villagers' rent-seeking behaviour fostered rural immigration and gentrification. In Xiaozhou, grassroots artists' aestheticisation and colonisation of the village ignited an initial stage of gentrification. The subsequent commodification of rural land and housing, induced by increasing concentration of art students and middle class "elite artists", led to deepened gentrification, studentification and eventually displacement of pioneer gentrifiers. In this process, local villagers' rent-seeking behaviour went hand in hand with aestheticisation and commodification of rural space. This finding questions the representations of victimised local rural residents in much of Western literature on rural gentrification. The special role played by the government policy and institutional arrangement in the stories of Xiaozhou also has the potential to add a new dimension to rural gentrification explanations. In sum, this paper shows that explanations of the perplexing dynamics of rural immigration and gentrification can benefit from more flexible and fluid conceptualisations of "gentrifiers" and "gentrification" as a whole. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rural Studies-
dc.subjectCommodification-
dc.subjectRent-seeking-
dc.subjectRural gentrification-
dc.subjectPost-socialist China-
dc.subjectAestheticisation-
dc.subjectCounter-urbanisation-
dc.titleAestheticisation, rent-seeking, and rural gentrification amidst China's rapid urbanisation: The case of Xiaozhou village, Guangzhou-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jrurstud.2013.08.002-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84884406649-
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.spage331-
dc.identifier.epage345-

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