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Article: Evolving enclave urbanism in China and its socio-spatial implications: the case of Guangzhou

TitleEvolving enclave urbanism in China and its socio-spatial implications: the case of Guangzhou
Authors
Keywordsenclave urbanism
Guangzhou
multidimensional dynamics
socio-spatial implication
China
Issue Date2013
Citation
Social and Cultural Geography, 2013, v. 14, n. 3, p. 243-275 How to Cite?
AbstractEnclave urbanism has deep historical roots in China, from the earliest forms of enclave residence, i.e. the walled city and courtyard housing, to the contemporary intricate mosaic of enclaves comprising danwei (work unit) compounds, gated commodity housing estates and migrant enclaves. Yet the evolution of enclave urbanism is not simply a convergence with Western urban forms, nor is it a process of historical succession or cultural inertia. The story of enclave urbanism is far more complicated. Exploring China's evolving urban enclaves and their socio-economic implications would add much richness and diversity to the international debates on enclave urbanism. The first half of the paper discusses the evolving processes and dynamics of China's enclave urbanism, with special reference to Guangzhou. The complex dynamics of China's enclave urbanism are evolving around various socio-economic, cultural, institutional and political forces, within which institutional arrangements for urban spatial organisation and social control are playing a fundamental role. To present a fuller picture of the plural socio-spatial connotations of China's enclave urbanism, the second half of the paper unpacks the heterogeneity of urban fabrics and examines how different social groups perceive and represent the social aspects of their lives. Featuring a high degree of heterogeneity within and between different types of neighbourhoods, enclave urbanism in China has entailed a complex relationship between urban form and social fabric. In addition, for various social groups, urban enclave living is endowed with very different social meanings. In gated commodity housing estates, enclave living is an expression of a safe, high-quality and privileged lifestyle. In urban villages, it is a compromise choice involving makeshift urban living resulting from suppressed rights to the city. And, in danwei compounds, it is a lingering lifestyle to which people used to be collectively assigned with no exercise of their own choice and from which they are now emotionally estranged. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207527
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.663
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.254

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Shenjing-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-31T01:01:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-31T01:01:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationSocial and Cultural Geography, 2013, v. 14, n. 3, p. 243-275-
dc.identifier.issn1464-9365-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207527-
dc.description.abstractEnclave urbanism has deep historical roots in China, from the earliest forms of enclave residence, i.e. the walled city and courtyard housing, to the contemporary intricate mosaic of enclaves comprising danwei (work unit) compounds, gated commodity housing estates and migrant enclaves. Yet the evolution of enclave urbanism is not simply a convergence with Western urban forms, nor is it a process of historical succession or cultural inertia. The story of enclave urbanism is far more complicated. Exploring China's evolving urban enclaves and their socio-economic implications would add much richness and diversity to the international debates on enclave urbanism. The first half of the paper discusses the evolving processes and dynamics of China's enclave urbanism, with special reference to Guangzhou. The complex dynamics of China's enclave urbanism are evolving around various socio-economic, cultural, institutional and political forces, within which institutional arrangements for urban spatial organisation and social control are playing a fundamental role. To present a fuller picture of the plural socio-spatial connotations of China's enclave urbanism, the second half of the paper unpacks the heterogeneity of urban fabrics and examines how different social groups perceive and represent the social aspects of their lives. Featuring a high degree of heterogeneity within and between different types of neighbourhoods, enclave urbanism in China has entailed a complex relationship between urban form and social fabric. In addition, for various social groups, urban enclave living is endowed with very different social meanings. In gated commodity housing estates, enclave living is an expression of a safe, high-quality and privileged lifestyle. In urban villages, it is a compromise choice involving makeshift urban living resulting from suppressed rights to the city. And, in danwei compounds, it is a lingering lifestyle to which people used to be collectively assigned with no exercise of their own choice and from which they are now emotionally estranged. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSocial and Cultural Geography-
dc.subjectenclave urbanism-
dc.subjectGuangzhou-
dc.subjectmultidimensional dynamics-
dc.subjectsocio-spatial implication-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.titleEvolving enclave urbanism in China and its socio-spatial implications: the case of Guangzhou-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14649365.2012.762112-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876056569-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage243-
dc.identifier.epage275-
dc.identifier.eissn1470-1197-

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