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Article: Property-led redevelopment in post-reform China: A case study of Xintiandi redevelopment project in Shanghai

TitleProperty-led redevelopment in post-reform China: A case study of Xintiandi redevelopment project in Shanghai
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
Journal of Urban Affairs, 2005, v. 27, n. 1, p. 1-23 How to Cite?
AbstractUrban redevelopment in China has experienced great transformation. Government-backed redevelopment has been replaced by privately funded and property-led redevelopment. This article discerns the impetus of ongoing property-led redevelopment. A case study of the Xintiandi project in Shanghai reveals how property-led redevelopment actually works. Pro-growth coalitions between local government and developers are formed. Despite its role as capital provider, the private, sector is still regulated by the government due to its negligible influence on local governance. The government controls the direction and pace of urban redevelopment through policy intervention, financial leverages, and governance of land leasing. Property-led redevelopment is driven by diverse motivations of different levels of the government, e.g. transforming urban land use functions, showing off the entrepreneurial capability of local government, and maximizing negotiated land benefits. Driven by profit seeking, some thriving urban neighborhoods are displaced by high-value property development, and suffer from uneven redevelopment. Copyright © 2005 Urban Affairs Association All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207503
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.889
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.619

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Shenjing-
dc.contributor.authorWu, Fulong-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-31T01:01:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-31T01:01:47Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Urban Affairs, 2005, v. 27, n. 1, p. 1-23-
dc.identifier.issn0735-2166-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207503-
dc.description.abstractUrban redevelopment in China has experienced great transformation. Government-backed redevelopment has been replaced by privately funded and property-led redevelopment. This article discerns the impetus of ongoing property-led redevelopment. A case study of the Xintiandi project in Shanghai reveals how property-led redevelopment actually works. Pro-growth coalitions between local government and developers are formed. Despite its role as capital provider, the private, sector is still regulated by the government due to its negligible influence on local governance. The government controls the direction and pace of urban redevelopment through policy intervention, financial leverages, and governance of land leasing. Property-led redevelopment is driven by diverse motivations of different levels of the government, e.g. transforming urban land use functions, showing off the entrepreneurial capability of local government, and maximizing negotiated land benefits. Driven by profit seeking, some thriving urban neighborhoods are displaced by high-value property development, and suffer from uneven redevelopment. Copyright © 2005 Urban Affairs Association All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Affairs-
dc.titleProperty-led redevelopment in post-reform China: A case study of Xintiandi redevelopment project in Shanghai-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.0735-2166.2005.00222.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-18844422973-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage23-

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