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Article: Ambient carbon monoxide associated with reduced risk of hospital admissions for respiratory tract infections

TitleAmbient carbon monoxide associated with reduced risk of hospital admissions for respiratory tract infections
Authors
KeywordsRespiratory tract infection
Carbon monoxide
Time series study
Issue Date2013
Citation
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2013, v. 188, n. 10, p. 1240-1245 How to Cite?
AbstractRationale: Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) at lower concentrations may have beneficial effects under certain circumstances, whereas populationbased epidemiologic studies of environmentally relevant CO exposure generated mixed findings. Objectives: To examine the acute effects of ambient CO on respiratory tract infection (RTI) hospitalizations. Methods: A time series study was conducted. Daily emergency hospital admission and air pollution data in Hong Kong were collected from January 2001 to December 2007. Log-linear Poisson models wereused to estimate the associations between daily hospital admissions for RTI and daily average concentrations of CO across three background air monitoring stations and three roadside stations, respectively, controlling for other traffic-related copollutants. Measurements and Main Results: CO concentrations were low during the study period with a daily average of 0.6 ppm in background stations and 1.0 ppm in roadside stations. Negative associations were found between ambient CO concentrations and daily hospital admissions for RTI. One ppm increase in background CO at lag 0-2 days was associated with 25.7% (95% confidence interval, 29.2 to 22.1) change in RTI admissions from the whole population according to single-pollutant model; the negative association became stronger when nitrogen dioxide or particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 mm was adjusted for in two-pollutant models.Thenegative associationseemedtobestronger in the adults than in the children and elderly. Conclusions: Short-termexposure to ambientCOwas associated with decreased risk of hospital admissions for RTI, suggesting some acute protective effectsof lowambientCOexposureonrespiratory infection. Copyright © 2013 by the American Thoracic Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207081
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 13.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.832

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTian, Linwei-
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Hong-
dc.contributor.authorPun, Vivianchit-
dc.contributor.authorLin, Hualiang-
dc.contributor.authorGe, Erjia-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jazz C.-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, Peter Kwok Keung-
dc.contributor.authorHo, Kinfai-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ignatius-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T04:31:22Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T04:31:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2013, v. 188, n. 10, p. 1240-1245-
dc.identifier.issn1073-449X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207081-
dc.description.abstractRationale: Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) at lower concentrations may have beneficial effects under certain circumstances, whereas populationbased epidemiologic studies of environmentally relevant CO exposure generated mixed findings. Objectives: To examine the acute effects of ambient CO on respiratory tract infection (RTI) hospitalizations. Methods: A time series study was conducted. Daily emergency hospital admission and air pollution data in Hong Kong were collected from January 2001 to December 2007. Log-linear Poisson models wereused to estimate the associations between daily hospital admissions for RTI and daily average concentrations of CO across three background air monitoring stations and three roadside stations, respectively, controlling for other traffic-related copollutants. Measurements and Main Results: CO concentrations were low during the study period with a daily average of 0.6 ppm in background stations and 1.0 ppm in roadside stations. Negative associations were found between ambient CO concentrations and daily hospital admissions for RTI. One ppm increase in background CO at lag 0-2 days was associated with 25.7% (95% confidence interval, 29.2 to 22.1) change in RTI admissions from the whole population according to single-pollutant model; the negative association became stronger when nitrogen dioxide or particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 mm was adjusted for in two-pollutant models.Thenegative associationseemedtobestronger in the adults than in the children and elderly. Conclusions: Short-termexposure to ambientCOwas associated with decreased risk of hospital admissions for RTI, suggesting some acute protective effectsof lowambientCOexposureonrespiratory infection. Copyright © 2013 by the American Thoracic Society.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine-
dc.subjectRespiratory tract infection-
dc.subjectCarbon monoxide-
dc.subjectTime series study-
dc.titleAmbient carbon monoxide associated with reduced risk of hospital admissions for respiratory tract infections-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1164/rccm.201304-0676OC-
dc.identifier.pmid23944864-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84887924215-
dc.identifier.volume188-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage1240-
dc.identifier.epage1245-
dc.identifier.eissn1535-4970-

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