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Article: Haemangiopericytoma of the trigeminal nerve

TitleHaemangiopericytoma of the trigeminal nerve
Authors
KeywordsComputerized tomography
Trigeminal nerve
Positron emission tomography scan
Meningioma
Magnetic resonance imaging
Haemangiopericytoma
Issue Date2001
Citation
Australasian Radiology, 2001, v. 45, n. 3, p. 350-353 How to Cite?
AbstractA 41-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of progressive right-sided diplopia on lateral gaze and right nasolabial paraesthesia. A CT revealed minor bone erosion of Meckel's cave and of the right petrous apex by a uniformly enhancing lesion at the base of the skull. Magnetic resonance imaging on three occasions over 2 years showed tumour, measuring 4 cm in diameter, with features suggestive of a trigeminal neuroma. At surgery the lesion had the macroscopic appearance of a giant schwannoma. Histopathological findings were that of a meningeal haemangiopericytoma (HPC) of the trigeminal nerve. Intracranial HPC are rare and aggressive tumours of the central nervous system. They usually arise from the falx, tentorium and durai sinuses. The present case is unique as it originates from a cranial nerve.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206999
ISSN
2009 Impact Factor: 0.51

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, Irene-
dc.contributor.authorSoo, Mark-
dc.contributor.authorNg, Thomas-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T04:31:13Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T04:31:13Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationAustralasian Radiology, 2001, v. 45, n. 3, p. 350-353-
dc.identifier.issn0004-8461-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206999-
dc.description.abstractA 41-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of progressive right-sided diplopia on lateral gaze and right nasolabial paraesthesia. A CT revealed minor bone erosion of Meckel's cave and of the right petrous apex by a uniformly enhancing lesion at the base of the skull. Magnetic resonance imaging on three occasions over 2 years showed tumour, measuring 4 cm in diameter, with features suggestive of a trigeminal neuroma. At surgery the lesion had the macroscopic appearance of a giant schwannoma. Histopathological findings were that of a meningeal haemangiopericytoma (HPC) of the trigeminal nerve. Intracranial HPC are rare and aggressive tumours of the central nervous system. They usually arise from the falx, tentorium and durai sinuses. The present case is unique as it originates from a cranial nerve.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAustralasian Radiology-
dc.subjectComputerized tomography-
dc.subjectTrigeminal nerve-
dc.subjectPositron emission tomography scan-
dc.subjectMeningioma-
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imaging-
dc.subjectHaemangiopericytoma-
dc.titleHaemangiopericytoma of the trigeminal nerve-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035430784-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage350-
dc.identifier.epage353-

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