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Article: Modes of Transmission of Influenza B Virus in Households

TitleModes of Transmission of Influenza B Virus in Households
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
PLoS One , 2014, v. 9 n. 9, p. e108850 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction:While influenza A and B viruses can be transmitted via respiratory droplets, the importance of small droplet nuclei "aerosols'' in transmission is controversial. Methods and Findings: In Hong Kong and Bangkok, in 2008-11, subjects were recruited from outpatient clinics if they had recent onset of acute respiratory illness and none of their household contacts were ill. Following a positive rapid influenza diagnostic test result, subjects were randomly allocated to one of three household-based interventions: hand hygiene, hand hygiene plus face masks, and a control group. Index cases plus their household contacts were followed for 7-10 days to identify secondary infections by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing of respiratory specimens. Index cases with RT-PCR-confirmed influenza B were included in the present analyses. We used a mathematical model to make inferences on the modes of transmission, facilitated by apparent differences in clinical presentation of secondary infections resulting from aerosol transmission. We estimated that approximately 37% and 26% of influenza B virus transmission was via the aerosol mode in households in Hong Kong and Bangkok, respectively. In the fitted model, influenza B virus infections were associated with a 56%-72% risk of fever plus cough if infected via aerosol route, and a 23%-31% risk of fever plus cough if infected via the other two modes of transmission. Conclusions: Aerosol transmission may be an important mode of spread of influenza B virus. The point estimates of aerosol transmission were slightly lower for influenza B virus compared to previously published estimates for influenza A virus in both Hong Kong and Bangkok. Caution should be taken in interpreting these findings because of the multiple assumptions inherent in the model, including that there is limited biological evidence to date supporting a difference in the clinical features of influenza B virus infection by different modes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206888
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuntarattiwong, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, SJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorUyeki, TMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChotpitayasunondh, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimmerman, JMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-02T11:14:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-02T11:14:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One , 2014, v. 9 n. 9, p. e108850en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206888-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction:While influenza A and B viruses can be transmitted via respiratory droplets, the importance of small droplet nuclei "aerosols'' in transmission is controversial. Methods and Findings: In Hong Kong and Bangkok, in 2008-11, subjects were recruited from outpatient clinics if they had recent onset of acute respiratory illness and none of their household contacts were ill. Following a positive rapid influenza diagnostic test result, subjects were randomly allocated to one of three household-based interventions: hand hygiene, hand hygiene plus face masks, and a control group. Index cases plus their household contacts were followed for 7-10 days to identify secondary infections by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing of respiratory specimens. Index cases with RT-PCR-confirmed influenza B were included in the present analyses. We used a mathematical model to make inferences on the modes of transmission, facilitated by apparent differences in clinical presentation of secondary infections resulting from aerosol transmission. We estimated that approximately 37% and 26% of influenza B virus transmission was via the aerosol mode in households in Hong Kong and Bangkok, respectively. In the fitted model, influenza B virus infections were associated with a 56%-72% risk of fever plus cough if infected via aerosol route, and a 23%-31% risk of fever plus cough if infected via the other two modes of transmission. Conclusions: Aerosol transmission may be an important mode of spread of influenza B virus. The point estimates of aerosol transmission were slightly lower for influenza B virus compared to previously published estimates for influenza A virus in both Hong Kong and Bangkok. Caution should be taken in interpreting these findings because of the multiple assumptions inherent in the model, including that there is limited biological evidence to date supporting a difference in the clinical features of influenza B virus infection by different modes.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleModes of Transmission of Influenza B Virus in Householdsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFang, J: vickyf@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0108850en_US
dc.identifier.pmid25268241-
dc.identifier.hkuros241511en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spagee108850en_US
dc.identifier.epagee108850en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000343671700179-

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