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Article: Students' Visualization of Diagrams Representing the Human Circulatory System: The use of spatial isomorphism and representational conventions

TitleStudents' Visualization of Diagrams Representing the Human Circulatory System: The use of spatial isomorphism and representational conventions
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
International Journal of Science Education, 2015, v. 37 n. 1, p. 136-161 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigated students' interpretation of diagrams representing the human circulatory system. We conducted an interview study with three students aged 14–15 (Year 10) who were studying biology in a Hong Kong school. During the interviews, students were asked to interpret diagrams and relationships between diagrams that represented aspects of the circulatory system. All diagrams used in the interviews had been used by their teacher when teaching the topic. Students' interpretations were expressed by their verbal response and their drawing. Dual coding theory was used to interpret students' responses. There was evidence that one student relied on verbal recall as a strategy in interpreting diagrams. It was found that students might have relied unduly on similarities in spatial features, rather than on deeper meanings represented by conventions, of diagrams when they associated diagrams that represented different aspects of the circulatory system. A pattern of students' understanding of structure–behaviour–function relationship of the biological system was observed. This study suggests the importance of a consistent diagrammatic and verbal representation in communicating scientific ideas. Implications for teaching practice that facilitates learning with diagrams and address students' undue focus on spatial features of diagrams are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206840

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, MMWen_US
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, JKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-02T10:11:09Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-02T10:11:09Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Science Education, 2015, v. 37 n. 1, p. 136-161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206840-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated students' interpretation of diagrams representing the human circulatory system. We conducted an interview study with three students aged 14–15 (Year 10) who were studying biology in a Hong Kong school. During the interviews, students were asked to interpret diagrams and relationships between diagrams that represented aspects of the circulatory system. All diagrams used in the interviews had been used by their teacher when teaching the topic. Students' interpretations were expressed by their verbal response and their drawing. Dual coding theory was used to interpret students' responses. There was evidence that one student relied on verbal recall as a strategy in interpreting diagrams. It was found that students might have relied unduly on similarities in spatial features, rather than on deeper meanings represented by conventions, of diagrams when they associated diagrams that represented different aspects of the circulatory system. A pattern of students' understanding of structure–behaviour–function relationship of the biological system was observed. This study suggests the importance of a consistent diagrammatic and verbal representation in communicating scientific ideas. Implications for teaching practice that facilitates learning with diagrams and address students' undue focus on spatial features of diagrams are discussed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Science Educationen_US
dc.titleStudents' Visualization of Diagrams Representing the Human Circulatory System: The use of spatial isomorphism and representational conventionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, MMW: mwcheng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, MMW=rp01547en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09500693.2014.969359en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros241601en_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.spage136en_US
dc.identifier.epage161en_US

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