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postgraduate thesis: Understanding holistic survivorship of women's breast cancer experiences during the transition period using movement-based focus groups

TitleUnderstanding holistic survivorship of women's breast cancer experiences during the transition period using movement-based focus groups
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Ho, RTH
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Leung, S. A. [梁少玲]. (2013). Understanding holistic survivorship of women's breast cancer experiences during the transition period using movement-based focus groups. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5223993
AbstractIn view of the increasing prevalence of female breast cancer in the global and local arenas, this disease has become a critical problem affecting women’s physical, psychological, spiritual and social conditions. With medical technology advancements, women can receive early diagnosis and effective treatment. However, maladjusted rehabilitation affects women’s long-term recovery. In order to improve women’s rehabilitation, more attention is being paid to breast cancer survivorship care after treatment. Therefore, how women experience and perceive breast cancer during the transition period is the important information for us to understand women’s breast cancer survivorship. The present study aims to explore how women perceive their breast cancer experiences during the transition period from a holistic perspective. This study adopted the qualitative inquiry approach. Movement-based focus group design was the present research design, in which dance/movement activities and group discussions were included. It is based on the belief that expressing through dance/movement enables an individual to reveal the experiences which have been stored in the body. Four focus groups were used, with a total of twenty recruited informants. Data collected from the focus group interviews included verbal (transcriptions) and non-verbal (writing/drawing and created body shapes) expressions. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using the ATLAS.ti 7 qualitative data analysis software. The findings indicated that women's descriptions of their experiences during the transition period were associated with bodily, emotional, cognitive, spiritual, and self and social relational perspectives. Five domains (bodily, emotional, cognitive, spiritual and self and social relational experiences) were generated after data processing. Analysis of the contents in each domain reveals the body-mind-spirit connection. During this period, women consider their health and exercise to be important, they were relaxed and happy, they reflected more, they searched for purpose and meaning in life, and they appreciated developing relationships with others and self. Furthermore, the results showed that these women attained self-growth through their breast cancer experiences. Nevertheless, the self-growth areas and pace were different for each individual. The results also revealed that the non-verbal information (writing/drawings and created body shapes) enriched the women’s expression by illustrating their in-depth or hidden breast cancer experiences. The results provide practitioners with insight and direction into designing rehabilitation programmes for breast cancer survivors. Therefore, the contents of the programme include not only psychosocial aspects but also bodily, cognitive and spiritual perspectives. Furthermore, the present movement-based focus group demonstrated the use of non-verbal expressions, as well as dance/movement, to enhance communication. To conclude, this study sheds light on our understanding of women’s breast cancer experiences during the transition period, as well as on the use of the movement-based focus group research method. The present practice and experiences may contribute to qualitative research and psychosocial oncology research. Further research with larger sample size is recommended. The present methodology can also be extended to other cancer populations such as cervical cancer survivors. Furthermore, studies examining the additional benefits of using movement in focus group interview are also recommended.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectBreast cancer - Patients - Rehabilitation
Dept/ProgramSocial Work and Social Administration
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206699

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorHo, RTH-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Siu-ling, Angela-
dc.contributor.author梁少玲-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T03:53:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-25T03:53:19Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationLeung, S. A. [梁少玲]. (2013). Understanding holistic survivorship of women's breast cancer experiences during the transition period using movement-based focus groups. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5223993-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206699-
dc.description.abstractIn view of the increasing prevalence of female breast cancer in the global and local arenas, this disease has become a critical problem affecting women’s physical, psychological, spiritual and social conditions. With medical technology advancements, women can receive early diagnosis and effective treatment. However, maladjusted rehabilitation affects women’s long-term recovery. In order to improve women’s rehabilitation, more attention is being paid to breast cancer survivorship care after treatment. Therefore, how women experience and perceive breast cancer during the transition period is the important information for us to understand women’s breast cancer survivorship. The present study aims to explore how women perceive their breast cancer experiences during the transition period from a holistic perspective. This study adopted the qualitative inquiry approach. Movement-based focus group design was the present research design, in which dance/movement activities and group discussions were included. It is based on the belief that expressing through dance/movement enables an individual to reveal the experiences which have been stored in the body. Four focus groups were used, with a total of twenty recruited informants. Data collected from the focus group interviews included verbal (transcriptions) and non-verbal (writing/drawing and created body shapes) expressions. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using the ATLAS.ti 7 qualitative data analysis software. The findings indicated that women's descriptions of their experiences during the transition period were associated with bodily, emotional, cognitive, spiritual, and self and social relational perspectives. Five domains (bodily, emotional, cognitive, spiritual and self and social relational experiences) were generated after data processing. Analysis of the contents in each domain reveals the body-mind-spirit connection. During this period, women consider their health and exercise to be important, they were relaxed and happy, they reflected more, they searched for purpose and meaning in life, and they appreciated developing relationships with others and self. Furthermore, the results showed that these women attained self-growth through their breast cancer experiences. Nevertheless, the self-growth areas and pace were different for each individual. The results also revealed that the non-verbal information (writing/drawings and created body shapes) enriched the women’s expression by illustrating their in-depth or hidden breast cancer experiences. The results provide practitioners with insight and direction into designing rehabilitation programmes for breast cancer survivors. Therefore, the contents of the programme include not only psychosocial aspects but also bodily, cognitive and spiritual perspectives. Furthermore, the present movement-based focus group demonstrated the use of non-verbal expressions, as well as dance/movement, to enhance communication. To conclude, this study sheds light on our understanding of women’s breast cancer experiences during the transition period, as well as on the use of the movement-based focus group research method. The present practice and experiences may contribute to qualitative research and psychosocial oncology research. Further research with larger sample size is recommended. The present methodology can also be extended to other cancer populations such as cervical cancer survivors. Furthermore, studies examining the additional benefits of using movement in focus group interview are also recommended.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshBreast cancer - Patients - Rehabilitation-
dc.titleUnderstanding holistic survivorship of women's breast cancer experiences during the transition period using movement-based focus groups-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5223993-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSocial Work and Social Administration-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5223993-

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