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postgraduate thesis: Distinction between nonconscious and conscious vision : evidence from hemispheric asymmetry effects

TitleDistinction between nonconscious and conscious vision : evidence from hemispheric asymmetry effects
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Hsiao, JHW
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chen, J. [陈静]. (2014). Distinction between nonconscious and conscious vision : evidence from hemispheric asymmetry effects. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5317057
AbstractHere we examined hemispheric differences in conscious and nonconscious perception using a masked priming paradigm. In Experiment 1, participants judged the direction of a grey target arrow (either left- or right-pointing), which was preceded by a grey prime arrow in either the left visual field (LVF)/right hemisphere (RH) or the right visual field (RVF)/left hemisphere (LH). The prime was either masked or unmasked. Participants reported unaware of the prime in the masked condition. We found a significant congruency effect (i.e., a faster response when the prime and target directions were congruent than when they were incongruent) when the prime was presented in the LVF/RH but not the RVF/LH in the masked (subliminal) condition. In contrast, in the unmasked (supraliminal) condition, the RVF prime had a stronger congruency effect than the LVF prime. In Experiment 2, a backward mask was used in all trials and the prime duration was manipulated to create subliminal and supraliminal conditions. In the subliminal condition, LVF/RH primes but not RVF/LH primes generated a congruency effect, whereas in the supraliminal condition, RVF/LH primes had a bigger congruency effect than LVF/RH primes. These qualitatively different hemispheric asymmetry effects in Experiment 1 and 2 suggest that nonconscious and conscious perception may involve different underlying mechanisms. In Experiment 3, color stimuli instead of grayscale stimuli were used. Neither the congruency effect nor the LVF/RH advantage was found in the subliminal condition, while a similar RVF/LH advantage in the congruency effect was found in the supraliminal condition. This result suggests that parvocellular input does not support the subliminal priming effect in the LVF/RH. Taking together, our results revealed a dissociation between the mechanisms underlying nonconscious and conscious processing, and this dissociation may be due to the dominant role of the magnocellular pathway in nonconscious vision.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectConsciousness
Cerebral dominance
Dept/ProgramPsychology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206426

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorHsiao, JHW-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jing-
dc.contributor.author陈静-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-31T23:15:51Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-31T23:15:51Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationChen, J. [陈静]. (2014). Distinction between nonconscious and conscious vision : evidence from hemispheric asymmetry effects. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5317057-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206426-
dc.description.abstractHere we examined hemispheric differences in conscious and nonconscious perception using a masked priming paradigm. In Experiment 1, participants judged the direction of a grey target arrow (either left- or right-pointing), which was preceded by a grey prime arrow in either the left visual field (LVF)/right hemisphere (RH) or the right visual field (RVF)/left hemisphere (LH). The prime was either masked or unmasked. Participants reported unaware of the prime in the masked condition. We found a significant congruency effect (i.e., a faster response when the prime and target directions were congruent than when they were incongruent) when the prime was presented in the LVF/RH but not the RVF/LH in the masked (subliminal) condition. In contrast, in the unmasked (supraliminal) condition, the RVF prime had a stronger congruency effect than the LVF prime. In Experiment 2, a backward mask was used in all trials and the prime duration was manipulated to create subliminal and supraliminal conditions. In the subliminal condition, LVF/RH primes but not RVF/LH primes generated a congruency effect, whereas in the supraliminal condition, RVF/LH primes had a bigger congruency effect than LVF/RH primes. These qualitatively different hemispheric asymmetry effects in Experiment 1 and 2 suggest that nonconscious and conscious perception may involve different underlying mechanisms. In Experiment 3, color stimuli instead of grayscale stimuli were used. Neither the congruency effect nor the LVF/RH advantage was found in the subliminal condition, while a similar RVF/LH advantage in the congruency effect was found in the supraliminal condition. This result suggests that parvocellular input does not support the subliminal priming effect in the LVF/RH. Taking together, our results revealed a dissociation between the mechanisms underlying nonconscious and conscious processing, and this dissociation may be due to the dominant role of the magnocellular pathway in nonconscious vision.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshConsciousness-
dc.subject.lcshCerebral dominance-
dc.titleDistinction between nonconscious and conscious vision : evidence from hemispheric asymmetry effects-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5317057-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePsychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5317057-

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