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Article: The Incarnation and Jesus’ apparent limitation of knowledge

TitleThe Incarnation and Jesus’ apparent limitation of knowledge
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd..
Citation
New Blackfriars, 2013, v. 94 n. 1053, p. 583-602 How to Cite?
AbstractOne of the problems confronting the doctrine of the Incarnation concerns Jesus’ apparent limitation in knowledge. This paper assesses various constructive proposals by modern theologians and philosophers, focusing on three of the most widely discussed solutions, namely Ontological Kenoticism, Two Consciousnesses Model, and Divine Subconscious Model. I argue that despite recent work done on the first two, the difficulties of avoiding the implication that the Logos ceased to be divine (for the first) and the implication of Nestorianism (for the second) remain. I conclude that the most promising solution is to defend Functional Kenoticism and develop the Divine Subconscious Model.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206301
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLoke, TEA-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-23T01:57:09Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-23T01:57:09Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationNew Blackfriars, 2013, v. 94 n. 1053, p. 583-602-
dc.identifier.issn1741-2005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206301-
dc.description.abstractOne of the problems confronting the doctrine of the Incarnation concerns Jesus’ apparent limitation in knowledge. This paper assesses various constructive proposals by modern theologians and philosophers, focusing on three of the most widely discussed solutions, namely Ontological Kenoticism, Two Consciousnesses Model, and Divine Subconscious Model. I argue that despite recent work done on the first two, the difficulties of avoiding the implication that the Logos ceased to be divine (for the first) and the implication of Nestorianism (for the second) remain. I conclude that the most promising solution is to defend Functional Kenoticism and develop the Divine Subconscious Model.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd..-
dc.relation.ispartofNew Blackfriars-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.titleThe Incarnation and Jesus’ apparent limitation of knowledgeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLoke, TEA: qaddeen@yahoo.com-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1741-2005.2012.01500.x-
dc.identifier.volume94-
dc.identifier.issue1053-
dc.identifier.spage583-
dc.identifier.epage602-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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