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Article: Elevational zonation and the phylogenetic relationships of the Henicorhina Wood-Wrens

TitleElevational zonation and the phylogenetic relationships of the Henicorhina Wood-Wrens
Authors
KeywordsPhylogeny
Ecuador
Elevational speciation
Wood-wren
Andes
Henicorhina
Phylogeography
Issue Date2006
Citation
Auk, 2006, v. 123, n. 1, p. 119-134 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Henicorhina wood-wren complex consists of three taxonomic species. Two of these, the Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (Henicorhina leucophrys) and the White-breasted Wood-Wren (H. leucosticta), are widespread throughout Central America and northern South America, with leucophrys occurring at higher elevations in regions where both occur. A third, recently described, species - the Bar-winged Wood-Wren (H. leucoptera) - occurs only in several isolated cordilleras in southeastern Ecuador and northeastern Peru, where it replaces the Gray-breasted Wood-Wren at the highest elevations. We used mitochondrial DNA sequences to explore the phylogenetic relationships among populations of these taxa and to draw inferences about the evolutionary origins of elevational zonation. We found substantial mitochondrial diversity within both leucophrys and leucosticta. Differentiation across the Andes in leucophrys was negligible, but populations from Central America and from northwestern Ecuador showed substantial differentiation. Three highly differentiated haplotype groups were also present in leucosticta, corresponding to populations in the eastern Andean lowlands, Central America, and the Chocó region of northwestern Ecuador; these populations may each warrant taxonomic species status. Bar-winged haplotypes nested within the mitochondrially diverse leucosticta group, where they were most closely allied to the geographically distant Chocó haplotypes. This leucoptera-leucosticta affinity is not consistent with previous inferences, based on plumage and behavioral similarities, that grouped leucoptera and leucophrys as sister species. These reconstructions refute the hypothesis that elevational zonation in this clade originated from in situ speciation along an elevational gradient, and instead highlight the role of complex changes in geographic distributions in fostering phylogenetic and ecological diversification. © The American Ornithologists' Union, 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206267
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.871
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.185
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDingle, Caroline-
dc.contributor.authorLovette, Irby John-
dc.contributor.authorCanaday, Christopher-
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Thomas Bates-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-22T01:25:32Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-22T01:25:32Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationAuk, 2006, v. 123, n. 1, p. 119-134-
dc.identifier.issn0004-8038-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206267-
dc.description.abstractThe Henicorhina wood-wren complex consists of three taxonomic species. Two of these, the Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (Henicorhina leucophrys) and the White-breasted Wood-Wren (H. leucosticta), are widespread throughout Central America and northern South America, with leucophrys occurring at higher elevations in regions where both occur. A third, recently described, species - the Bar-winged Wood-Wren (H. leucoptera) - occurs only in several isolated cordilleras in southeastern Ecuador and northeastern Peru, where it replaces the Gray-breasted Wood-Wren at the highest elevations. We used mitochondrial DNA sequences to explore the phylogenetic relationships among populations of these taxa and to draw inferences about the evolutionary origins of elevational zonation. We found substantial mitochondrial diversity within both leucophrys and leucosticta. Differentiation across the Andes in leucophrys was negligible, but populations from Central America and from northwestern Ecuador showed substantial differentiation. Three highly differentiated haplotype groups were also present in leucosticta, corresponding to populations in the eastern Andean lowlands, Central America, and the Chocó region of northwestern Ecuador; these populations may each warrant taxonomic species status. Bar-winged haplotypes nested within the mitochondrially diverse leucosticta group, where they were most closely allied to the geographically distant Chocó haplotypes. This leucoptera-leucosticta affinity is not consistent with previous inferences, based on plumage and behavioral similarities, that grouped leucoptera and leucophrys as sister species. These reconstructions refute the hypothesis that elevational zonation in this clade originated from in situ speciation along an elevational gradient, and instead highlight the role of complex changes in geographic distributions in fostering phylogenetic and ecological diversification. © The American Ornithologists' Union, 2006.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAuk-
dc.subjectPhylogeny-
dc.subjectEcuador-
dc.subjectElevational speciation-
dc.subjectWood-wren-
dc.subjectAndes-
dc.subjectHenicorhina-
dc.subjectPhylogeography-
dc.titleElevational zonation and the phylogenetic relationships of the Henicorhina Wood-Wrens-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1642/0004-8038(2006)123[0119:EZATPR]2.0.CO;2-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-32344444374-
dc.identifier.volume123-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage119-
dc.identifier.epage134-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235293300011-

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