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Conference Paper: Association between perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes and body mass index: A 12 country study

TitleAssociation between perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes and body mass index: A 12 country study
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 90, abstract no. S30.3 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The overall purpose of this study was to examine the strength, direction and shape of the associations between perceived neighbourhood built environmental attributes and BMI. Variation of the associations by study site as well as the interactions with neighbourhood-level socioeconomic status (SES) were also explored. Methods: Pooled data from the 12 participating countries (5 continents) of the International Physical Activity Environment Network (IPEN) study were used. Similar measures and protocols were executed in all study sites. Perceived neighbourhood built environmental attributes were measured with the NEWS questionnaire, BMI was assessed by self-reporting height and weight in eight countries and by objective data using standardised techniques in four countries. Results: In general, only few environmental attributes were predictive of weight status or BMI over and above the socio-demographic characteristics. Safety from traffic was the only environmental attribute that was predictive of both a better weight status (less overweight/obese), and a lower BMI. For the continuous BMI variable, higher land use mix diversity and perceived safety from crime (curvilinear) were additionally related with lower BMI. Conclusions: The closer the perceived walking proximity to nine categories of common destinations, and the safer it is to reach these destinations (no heavy traffic along nearby streets, slow traffic speed, speeding drivers), the lower the body mass of the inhabitants of the urban and suburban regions across the world. Moreover, in neighbourhoods with very low perceived crime safety, a small increase in crime safety could possibly lead to a strong decrease in BMI.
DescriptionSymposia: S30
The Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206118

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Dyck, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSalvo, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSchofield, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSarmiento, OLen_US
dc.contributor.authorMitas, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSallis, JFen_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-20T12:29:04Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-20T12:29:04Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 90, abstract no. S30.3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206118-
dc.descriptionSymposia: S30-
dc.descriptionThe Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The overall purpose of this study was to examine the strength, direction and shape of the associations between perceived neighbourhood built environmental attributes and BMI. Variation of the associations by study site as well as the interactions with neighbourhood-level socioeconomic status (SES) were also explored. Methods: Pooled data from the 12 participating countries (5 continents) of the International Physical Activity Environment Network (IPEN) study were used. Similar measures and protocols were executed in all study sites. Perceived neighbourhood built environmental attributes were measured with the NEWS questionnaire, BMI was assessed by self-reporting height and weight in eight countries and by objective data using standardised techniques in four countries. Results: In general, only few environmental attributes were predictive of weight status or BMI over and above the socio-demographic characteristics. Safety from traffic was the only environmental attribute that was predictive of both a better weight status (less overweight/obese), and a lower BMI. For the continuous BMI variable, higher land use mix diversity and perceived safety from crime (curvilinear) were additionally related with lower BMI. Conclusions: The closer the perceived walking proximity to nine categories of common destinations, and the safer it is to reach these destinations (no heavy traffic along nearby streets, slow traffic speed, speeding drivers), the lower the body mass of the inhabitants of the urban and suburban regions across the world. Moreover, in neighbourhoods with very low perceived crime safety, a small increase in crime safety could possibly lead to a strong decrease in BMI.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA)en_US
dc.titleAssociation between perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes and body mass index: A 12 country studyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240770en_US
dc.identifier.spage90, abstract no. S30.3-
dc.identifier.epage90, abstract no. S30.3-

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