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Conference Paper: Perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults’ walking and bicycling for transport: Findings from a 12-country study

TitlePerceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults’ walking and bicycling for transport: Findings from a 12-country study
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 89-90, abstract no. S30.2 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To understand which built environment perceptions correlate with walking and bicycling for transport, and to examine the strength and shape of these relationships across diverse cities and countries. Methods: Common study methods were performed across 17 cities in 12 countries. Participants were selected from neighborhoods that varied in walkability and where possible income. Nine scales from the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale assessed the perceived environment. The IPAQ long measured transportation walking and bicycling. Outcomes included any walking/bicycling, 150+ minutes per week of walking/bicycling and total minutes walking/bicycling in those who walked/biked. GAMMS analyses were employed to assess the shape and strength of relationships and investigate city interactions. Results: Percentages of the 13,745 participants reporting any walking ranged from 52-92%, any bicycling from 1-63%, meeting walking guidelines from 14-62%, and 150+ minutes bicycling 0-29%. Total minutes walking ranged from 79 to 402 and total minutes bicycling ranged from 1- 136. Stores and transit stops within easy access, street connectivity, infrastructure safety (street lights, crossings and sidewalks), aesthetics, and local destinations were related to any walking or bicycling for transport and walking or bicycling for transport > 150 minutes a week. Safety was negatively related to outcomes. Some cities presented stronger relationships than others and in some cities the results were not in the expected direction. Conclusions: Our study found more consistent environmental predictors for both bicycling and walking for transportation than previous studies suggesting that built environment interventions might impact both behaviors in a “two for one” manner.
DescriptionSymposia: S30
The Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206117

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorNatarajan, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCarlson, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorEmond, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorBadland, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSarmiento, OLen_US
dc.contributor.authorReis, RSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-20T12:29:03Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-20T12:29:03Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 89-90, abstract no. S30.2en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206117-
dc.descriptionSymposia: S30-
dc.descriptionThe Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To understand which built environment perceptions correlate with walking and bicycling for transport, and to examine the strength and shape of these relationships across diverse cities and countries. Methods: Common study methods were performed across 17 cities in 12 countries. Participants were selected from neighborhoods that varied in walkability and where possible income. Nine scales from the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale assessed the perceived environment. The IPAQ long measured transportation walking and bicycling. Outcomes included any walking/bicycling, 150+ minutes per week of walking/bicycling and total minutes walking/bicycling in those who walked/biked. GAMMS analyses were employed to assess the shape and strength of relationships and investigate city interactions. Results: Percentages of the 13,745 participants reporting any walking ranged from 52-92%, any bicycling from 1-63%, meeting walking guidelines from 14-62%, and 150+ minutes bicycling 0-29%. Total minutes walking ranged from 79 to 402 and total minutes bicycling ranged from 1- 136. Stores and transit stops within easy access, street connectivity, infrastructure safety (street lights, crossings and sidewalks), aesthetics, and local destinations were related to any walking or bicycling for transport and walking or bicycling for transport > 150 minutes a week. Safety was negatively related to outcomes. Some cities presented stronger relationships than others and in some cities the results were not in the expected direction. Conclusions: Our study found more consistent environmental predictors for both bicycling and walking for transportation than previous studies suggesting that built environment interventions might impact both behaviors in a “two for one” manner.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA)en_US
dc.titlePerceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults’ walking and bicycling for transport: Findings from a 12-country studyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240768en_US
dc.identifier.spage89, abstract no. S30.2-
dc.identifier.epage90, abstract no. S30.2-

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